Weep Not, Child

Weep Not Child Tells the moving story about the effects of the Mau Mau war on the lives of ordinary men and women in Kenya In the forests the Mau Mau are waging war against the white government and two brothers K

  • Title: Weep Not, Child
  • Author: Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o
  • ISBN: 9780435908300
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Paperback
  • Tells the moving story about the effects of the Mau Mau war on the lives of ordinary men and women in Kenya In the forests, the Mau Mau are waging war against the white government, and two brothers, Kamau and Njoroge, and the rest of the family must decide where their loyalties lie.

    One thought on “Weep Not, Child”

    1. Described in many reviews as 'a simple story', this book only appears so, I think, because it's written in an economical, limpid style reminiscent of folk tales or anecdote. The narrative follows Njoroge as he grows from a small child to a young adult, locked in his time like a balloon in the wind, and we most often see things from his perspective, but sensitive critique of his naïve and sometimes ignorant viewpoint, and those of others, is implicit throughout. When Njoroge finds 'Lucia' a nice [...]

    2. I read this book as a child growing up in Liberia, West Africa. I remember loving the language and the rich culture that very similar to my own. I look forward to reading it again as an adult and growing a deeper appreciation for it.

    3. Το ντεμπούτο του μεγάλου Αφρικανού συγγραφέα προσφέρεται για αρκετές κ διαφορετικές ματιές. Κατά μια έννοια θα μπορούσε ο αναγνώστης να το δει ως μια εκδοχή του Ρωμαίου κ της Ιουλιέτας κ να έχει δίκιο. Το βιβλίο το διαπερνά η σχέση του νεαρού αφηγητή με την κόρη του πιο πλού [...]

    4. A well developed African story of hope and disappointment set in Kenya during the Mau Mau uprising. Ngugi weaves fiction and nonfiction well to provide both depth of characters and storyline. What I admire most is the sense of realism injected into the story, never a perfect character, rarely an ideal scenario coming to fruition, no perfect ending.

    5. 3.5 stars.Read without placing it in relevant contexts, this book will seem nothing special. The writing reminds me of R. K. Narayan, which if I refuse to think beyond that would put me off. But there's a reason why the writing of Ngugi's first English novel and R. K. Narayan's work in English is so simple and direct. There's a reason why their stories aren't all that special. They bring to life the first generation of what was to evolve into proper postcolonial literature. There's power in that [...]

    6. Una storia cruda e triste del rapporto conflittuale tra l'uomo bianco e la popolazione locale del Kenya. Il protagonista è un bambino che vuole istruirsi e "riscattare" pacificamente la propria identità culturale - ma in realtà nemmeno quello, lui vuole solo istruirsi. Chi vuole riscattare la popolazione Kenyota è il padre, e il fratello che aderisce a un gruppo di guerriglieri.Finirà male per entrambi.

    7. Os seré sincera: no conocía esta historia. Las palabras «Mau Mau» despertaban un recuerdo tímido en mi cabeza, de algo quizás aprendido por encima en el colegio, pero la cosa no iba más allá. Y tras la lectura y comprensión de todos los sucesos, una no puede evitar una enorme tristeza, tanto por no conocer la historia con anterioridad como por el hecho de que se trata un relato de privaciones y vejaciones constantes, contado por un experimentado narrador con una voz impecable y un gusto [...]

    8. This book was a jumbled mess that had a lot of potential. The writer's style was too simple, and the direction of the story was horrible. That's as much critique as I can muster. It was a waste of reading time.

    9. This is a very good and short novel that addresses the stress and anguish of late colonialism in Kenya. This text is rich on many levels as it deals with hope, despair, injustice, redemption, etc. I'm going to teach this in both African history and World History.

    10. A slim book set in Central Kenya during the struggle for independence. I thought it exquisite and devastating. Highly recommend.

    11. *spoiler alert!Ngugi gives us an intimate account of how real people and families were effected by the Mau Mau Rebellion in Kenya in the 1950's and how the same interests of preserving land rights got cast as vastly different and racialized interests, resulting in the deaths of many. Following Njoroge through his coming of age,we see him first as a young boy who believes that through education and learning, he can save his country, then as a devout Christian who sees himself as God's chosen one [...]

    12. this was my third novel by ngugi, and possibly my least favorite? don't get me wrong, it's a worthwhile read, but i vastly prefer his later a grain of wheat (amazing!). weep not, child seems like a sketch by comparison. that said, ngugi's light story-telling touch works as well as ever-- he renders his characters with a willful naivete that would almost remind me of kurt vonnegut, were it not so free of snark (and full of wonder). the characters-- though likeable-- are a bit one-dimensional, and [...]

    13. It may be in part due to my inability to absorb the particular setting of African colonialism, but it seems to me that the whole thing about African literature falls short of what it claims to be. It always reminds me somewhat of Hemingway hypes. You hope for the heap of what seems to be treasure passed down from old time, only to find some overrated, overused junks. It certainly has some value in cultural aspects and flaunts unique perspectives that need to be told. Like many of Wa Thiong'o's b [...]

    14. I am not a fan of Classics but the synopsis caught my interest. It was good in the beginning but then the character soon became dismiss able as the pages turned. My main problem with this book was the lack of characterization and how silly it came across. There was absolutely no direction or anything that motivated me to continue reading. This book only emphasized why I do not read many Classics, cause most of the time I am disappointed with the execution.Oh well it was "okay" but I doubt I woul [...]

    15. I am not a fan of Classics but the synopsis caught my interest. It was good in the beginning but then the character soon became dismiss able as the pages turned. My main problem with this book was the lack of characterization and how silly it came across. There was absolutely no direction or anything that motivated me to continue reading. This book only emphasized why I do not read many Classics, cause most of the time I am disappointed with the execution.Oh well it was "okay" but I doubt I woul [...]

    16. This is written in a pared-down though poetic style that makes it feel mythic, though the story is very much set in a particular place and time (Kenya, the Mau Mau uprising). It's in some ways a simple story--Romeo and Juliet maybe, as Ben Okri writes in the intro--but in other ways rather complex in its renderings of various divisions in Kenyan society of this period. Even the white characters who wind up on the side of repression and torture are granted their humanity--which in this novel mean [...]

    17. Behöver läsa mer av Ngũgĩ innan jag kan säga något om honom - denna var så tydligt en debutroman. Fina punkter och stunder men med många skavanker, särskilt vad gäller karakterisering.Skildringen av förtryck fick mig att tänka på en av Farrokhzads formuleringar: Det enda språk du kan fördöma förgripelsen på är förgriparens språk / och förgriparens språk är ett språk som uppfanns för att rättfärdiga förgripelsen.

    18. The writing style is simple, and Thiong'o is a good storyteller. That said, it seemed disconnected at times and huge gaps occur that you have to fill in yourself. I was hoping to get a bit more information about Kenyan culture from this, but it didn't seem to be what I was hoping for.

    19. Like most people faced with challenges-this book is all about them and how much dreams are blurred by brutality and how the only people who you think have lost it all still gain the strength to hope for another day.

    20. Nestāv ne tuvu "A Grain of Wheat" manās acīs: pārāk švaki ieskicēts, pārāk paļaujas uz melodrāmu un arī tēli šeit ir daudz plakātiskāki.

    21. Clearly a first book- after reading Ngũgĩ's childhood memoirs this book clearly had a lot borrowed from his own experiences growing up.

    22. One of my favorite parts about reading African fiction is getting introduced to pieces of history that I know nothing about. No disappointment on this front as the novel is set against the backdrop of the Mau Mau uprising in Kenya, which I previously knew nothing about. Very interesting to get a taste of this conflict and a sense of what was at stake.The brevity of the work keeps it (to some extent) from reaching the depth that I would love to see, but it's well executed overall. One of the most [...]

    23. I had to read this book for my African history class and it only started getting interesting about midway into the story. I was confused for a while, because so many names are presented, with little to no context of these characters.Nevertheless, though this story's plot moved very slowly, it was still interesting to see what would happen to the characters, especially Njoroge, because you're brought along on his life's journey from the start. I thought it was well-written and provided great cont [...]

    24. In reading comments by other reviewers, I wonder if they don't realize this is the author's first book and if they expect it to read like a book written by a Western author. Protagonist Ngjoroge's dreams, perspective and relationships--especially with Mwihaki--and the effects off the Mau Mau Uprising on various characters feel realistic to me, as does the conclusion. It's interesting to read The River Between before this title as this one takes place about 50 years later and references the same [...]

    25. On the surface this is a coming-of-age story, set in a world that slowly grows more chaotic as colonial rule is coming to an end. On a deeper level we see the restraints of society forcing us into the roles we are expected to fill, regardless of our efforts. Most clearly we see this in the main character Njoroge, who does everything "right" with the goal of saving first his family, then his country from poverty and injustice, only to be forced into the role society has given him. We see this too [...]

    26. While I had some issues with the representation of women in this novel, it was definitely a touching and emotional tale of a young man growing up amid sociopolitical turmoil in 1950's Kenya. The focus on education shows just how powerful knowledge can be, and how it can simultaneously be a way to achieve equality, and a means of social and cultural oppression. The ending was not exactly satisfying, but I suppose that can be seen as a reflection of the (at the time) unfulfilled struggle for indep [...]

    27. Un libro que muestra la forma de vida de muchos africanos durante la época del Mau Mau, los conflictos entre los de su propia raza, aquellos que sostenían con los blancos, y los que debían sobrellevar con ellos mismos. Una narración sencilla en donde los anhelos, la familia y el desarrollo social y personal son los protagonistas. Es triste ver como los sueños se marchitan y la vida va matando tus ilusiones.Lectura muy recomendada.

    28. Wish I had read this long before. But it is a powerful parable at a time that white people in the U.S. seem to think that they are a persecuted minority. Amazing to see how people can remain blind to privilege.I've seen it as a textbook in many college classes, and IMHO it should be required reading.

    29. Set in Kenya during the Mau Mau Uprising, this book tells the story of the war and colonialism's effect on a young man, his family and his people. Very glad I was assigned to read this in college or I may never have picked it up.

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