Double Victory: How African American Women Broke Race and Gender Barriers to Help Win World War II

Double Victory How African American Women Broke Race and Gender Barriers to Help Win World War II Winner of American Library Association Amelia Bloomer Top Ten List This is an excellent title for expanding students view of the Civil Rights Movement School Library Journal A valuable asset Kirk

  • Title: Double Victory: How African American Women Broke Race and Gender Barriers to Help Win World War II
  • Author: Cheryl Mullenbach
  • ISBN: 9781569768082
  • Page: 252
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Winner of American Library Association 2014 Amelia Bloomer Top Ten List This is an excellent title for expanding students view of the Civil Rights Movement School Library Journal A valuable asset Kirkus Reviews Allow all black nurses to enlist, and the draft won t be necessary If nurses are needed so desperately, why isn t the Army using colored nurses My aWinner of American Library Association 2014 Amelia Bloomer Top Ten List This is an excellent title for expanding students view of the Civil Rights Movement School Library Journal A valuable asset Kirkus Reviews Allow all black nurses to enlist, and the draft won t be necessary If nurses are needed so desperately, why isn t the Army using colored nurses My arm gets a little sore slinging a shovel or a pick, but then I forget about it when I think about all those boys over in the Solomons Double Victory tells the stories of African American women who did extraordinary things to help their country during World War II In these pages young readers meet a range of remarkable women war workers, political activists, military women, volunteers, and entertainers Some, such as Mary McLeod Bethune and Lena Horne, were celebrated in their lifetimes and are well known today But many others fought discrimination at home and abroad in order to contribute to the war effort yet were overlooked during those years and forgotten by later generations Double Victory recovers the stories of these courageous women, such as Hazel Dixon Payne, the only woman to serve on the remote Alaska Canadian Highway Deverne Calloway, a Red Cross worker who led a protest at an army base in India and Betty Murphy Phillips, the only black female overseas war correspondent Offering a new and diverse perspective on the war and including source notes and a bibliography, Double Victory is an invaluable addition to any student s or history buff s bookshelf.

    One thought on “Double Victory: How African American Women Broke Race and Gender Barriers to Help Win World War II”

    1. I didn't like this book nearly as much as I'd liked Mullenbach's Women Heroes of World War II, possibly because it's much more general and doesn't really get in depth with any particular woman's experiences. That said, it does cover an important subject. Americans have, as a nation, been all too willing to forget that protecting racism was more important than winning World War II. As in it's preferable to have a hospital for vets be understaffed than to stoop to the horror of hiring black women [...]

    2. I have been given the great honor of blurbing this book! Here's one of my attempts:Mullenbach has done a great service in telling the stories of these pre-Civil Rights women who had to fight through racial injustice in order to win the right to fight Fascism. The humiliations they had to endure makes for tough reading but their inspiring determination shines through every page.But this is what I actually sent in on Monday:"Cheryl Mullenbach has done a great service in telling the stories of thes [...]

    3. February is Black History Month and way back in 2011, I looked at a book about African American soldiers in World War II called The Double V Campaign: African Americans and World War II by Michael L. Cooper. The Double V Campaign demanded that African Americans who were risking their lives fighting for freedom and democracy abroad should be given full civil rights at home - Victory at home AND abroad. Cooper's book is an interesting, well-researched book, but it doesn't tell the whole story of t [...]

    4. I'm so glad I read this book. Definitely an eye opener for too much of the American public. There are far too many examples of ridiculousness involved here. That's actually a credit to the author. The examples are great, and I love that she seemed to drop as many names as possible. It's nice to put as many names out there as possible with a book like this.The ridiculousness has to do with the racists. I know it was the 40's but I'm flat out appalled by some of the examples presented here. Foolis [...]

    5. I really wanted to like,this book. I loved the idea of how African American women pushed the boundaries to get more equal rights, but wow was this dry. I couldn't finish it.

    6. This book highlights the tremendous contributions of many women who were overlooked in our history books.

    7. So disappointing, I couldn't bring myself to finish it. Such a rich and important topic and such a dry, sanitized presentation that speaks down to its audience.

    8. "Double Victory" is an interesting and relevant resource for YA readers who are interested in the role of African American Women during WWII. Many of these stories highlight the contributions and challenges faced by these pioneer women. The brief stories and photos make reading about this fascinating group come alive. Pick and choose your interests from War Workers, Political Activists, In the Military, Volunteers or Entertainers. Thank you GoodReads for the book.

    9. It was not a fast read for me, I did like that it gave a lot of the womenś background but I did not like how it didn´t move along it stayed on a certain women for a while.

    10. Review Posted on Reading Lark 2/2/13: readinglark/2013/In honor of Black History Month, I jumped at the chance to read this one. I am constantly seeking out stories to inspire my students and share new experiences with them. I was particularly drawn to this book because it featured the story of African American women in WWII. So many students are intrigued by the WWII era, but often the story of women and minorities remains largely unheard. This book showcases the courage, bravery, and contribut [...]

    11. This is one of those books you rate higher than normal, simply for its historical value and the work that was done on a topic that is not nearly covered enough. It's clearly for young adults, but I think it may be written too dryly for them. What I appreciate about this book is that Mullenbach covers the "big names" just as much as the small (although her repeated backhanded compliments to Josephine Baker left me scratching my head a bit). I don't know that the formatting of the book works well [...]

    12. Usually I don't like broad views of historical subjects. I prefer more detailed stories. That holds true here. I desperately want to read about Josephine Baker--dancer and secret allied spy--or Lula Jones Garrett--journalist extraordinaire. However, there is something powerful about seeing so many similar stories. Women trying their hardest to help their country win a vital war and facing discrimination every step of the way. The irony of defeating an enemy claiming to be the master race while s [...]

    13. Amazing! This book should be in every library and classroom around the country and the world. Focusing on the many accomplishments of African American women during the second World World while also focusing on the discrimination they still faced showed the heroism of the women from two different perspectives.

    14. This is a book about a fascinating subject -- African--American women's contribution during WW II. Unfortunately, the author's writing style is that of someone who has been asked to write a 9th grade history textbook (she's a social studies consultant). I did manage to overcome it to a sufficient extent that I missed my stop.

    15. This book is written for young people, so the writing is simplified to some degree. It contains lots of information and photographs, mainly about lesser known people and events. I am currently writing a novel for which this was helpful. It's not a scholarly tome --- very accessible and I would recommend it for use in schools.

    16. The information is great, and I think a high school student doing research for a short paper would find plenty of examples in this book of strong African American women who made a difference. However, the book reads like a series of lists--not an engaging style at all.

    17. This was mostly for YA readers, but it felt good going in. Do not ignore the contributions of anyone to society, least of all, women of color.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *