The Victory Season: The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball's Golden Age

The Victory Season The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball s Golden Age The triumphant story of baseball and America after World War IIIn Major League Baseball had become a ghost of itself Parks were half empty the balls were made with fake rubber and mediocre repl

  • Title: The Victory Season: The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball's Golden Age
  • Author: Robert Weintraub
  • ISBN: 9780316205917
  • Page: 446
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The triumphant story of baseball and America after World War IIIn 1945 Major League Baseball had become a ghost of itself Parks were half empty, the balls were made with fake rubber, and mediocre replacements roamed the fields, as hundreds of players, including the game s biggest stars, were serving abroad, devoted to unconditional Allied victory in World War II.But by thThe triumphant story of baseball and America after World War IIIn 1945 Major League Baseball had become a ghost of itself Parks were half empty, the balls were made with fake rubber, and mediocre replacements roamed the fields, as hundreds of players, including the game s biggest stars, were serving abroad, devoted to unconditional Allied victory in World War II.But by the spring of 1946, the country was ready to heal The war was finally over, and as America s fathers and brothers were coming home, so too were the sport s greats Ted Williams, Stan Musial, and Joe DiMaggio returned with bats blazing, making the season a true classic that ended in a thrilling seven game World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the St Louis Cardinals America also witnessed the beginning of a new era in baseball it was a year of attendance records, the first year Yankee Stadium held night games, the last year the Green Monster wasn t green, and, most significant, Jackie Robinson s first year playing in the Brooklyn Dodgers system.The Victory Season brings to vivid life these years of baseball and war, including the littleknown World Series that servicemen played in a captured Hitler Youth stadium in the fall of 1945 Robert Weintraub s extensive research and vibrant storytelling enliven the legendary season that embodies what we now think of as the game s golden era.

    One thought on “The Victory Season: The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball's Golden Age”

    1. The year 1946 was a watershed in Post-World War II America. It is the year that Robert Weintraub points out in his book, VICTORY SEASON: THE END OF WORLD WAR II AND THE BIRTH OF BASEBALL’S GOLDEN AGE that the United States had to reinvent itself from a collectivist society that was geared toward winning the war to one that could reabsorb millions of servicemen and women at a time when the country was unprepared to receive them. 1946 witnessed severe labor disruption, spiraling prices, wages th [...]

    2. I don’t usually read baseball books during baseball season. I like to save them for the off-season. It’s a great system where I don’t over-baseball myself during the summer (Is that even possible?), and it gives me some baseball in the winter when I start jonesin’ for it. I made an exception for this book because it sounded more interesting than the typical baseball memoir, and I didn’t think I could wait till December to read it. I’m glad I didn’t wait.For a book that covers one s [...]

    3. Robert Weintraub’s The Victory Season: The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball's Golden Age focuses on major league baseball’s 1946 season, notable as the first post-World War II campaign and the beginning of what some call baseball’s golden age. Some star players who went to war returned for the ’46 season in excellent form, like Ted Williams and Bob Feller. Other players returned with less skill than before the war. Of course, still others paid the ultimate sacrifice and did [...]

    4. Three things going on in this book. First, the author traces the military experiences of many pro baseball players that served in WW 2 and the first year of baseball after the war. Second, he follows Jackie Robinson's first year in the minor and major leagues. Lastly, he gives you start to finish coverage of the 1946 pennant race culminating in an epic series between the Red Sox and Cardinals. This book will make a baseball historical junkie's heart beat a little faster. For the audience this bo [...]

    5. The Victory Season wraps three narratives into one amazing book: the return of baseball's players (and their country) to something resembling normalcy after the war, the thrilling 1946 season and the struggles within baseball to modernize, and the first season of professional baseball for one Jackie Robinson.Season is at turns exciting and sobering, from heroic feats on the diamond and in war, to the brutal realities of conflict at home and abroad. Intermingled with the stories of legendary grea [...]

    6. I liked the premise of this book, but found that the story was lacking because of the over kill of facts. If you are a baseball history buff you will love this book.

    7. I read and enjoyed Robert Weintraub's previous book, The House That Ruth Built, so when I saw this book on the library's shelves, I grabbed it immediately. I was not disappointed even though this story is a little harder to tell. There are a LOT of people involved in this story. Weintraub methodically brings everything together. To be honest, about 1/2 way through the book, I was thinking "this is good, but less compelling than the earlier book." But if you stick it out until the end, you'll be [...]

    8. This book is magnificent! It very possibly might be every bit as good as Mark Frost's Game Six, which chronicles only one game of the 1975 World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the Cincinnati Reds.Many professional ballplayers missed several years of play during WWII, some serving in combat, while others were lucky enough to get to play ball in places like Hawaii. There were a handful that weren't so lucky and never made it back to play again. But in 1946, most of the players returned to p [...]

    9. Similar to October 1964 or Summer of '49, this story winds its way through the 1946 season while providing background on players and teams while mixing in current events.And wow, there was a lot happening in 1946! American soldiers returned from the war and found housing shortages, meat shortages and government regulated pricing on all sorts of everyday items. There was also labor unrest, both in America and major league baseball, and the simple challenge of integrating millions of soldiers back [...]

    10. I didn't really start following baseball until the late 1950's, so I am a little too young to remember most of the everyday players discussed in this book, although not too young to know the really famous players (and managers) who are a big part of this season, such as Ted Williams, Stan Musial, Country Slaughter, Leo Durocher, and Harry and Dixie Walker, to name the most famous ones. I enjoyed Weintraub's recount of the 1946 baseball season, including the International League where Jackie Robi [...]

    11. A really good book on the 1946 baseball season and what was going on in the world outside the baseball field. This book kind of started out a little slow for me but got really interesting after a third of the way through. A lot of interesting stories here including ones on Jackie Robinson starting his play in the minor leagues in Montreal, (where the fans loved him), Leo Durocher, Stan Musial, Ted Williams, Dom Dimaggio, Pete Reiser and others. The story about halfway through then focuses on the [...]

    12. After Farewell to the Last Golden Era: The Yankees, the Pirates and the 1960 Baseball Season turned out to be rather dry, I was hoping that this would be interesting. I should probably note that technically, I received a free time-limited e-copy of this via Netgalley. But I forgot what the time limit was, and I had to get this from the library instead.I was pleased with the beginning. I felt like Weintraub had the genuine storyteller's touch; that's important in a book like this, which is about [...]

    13. Great book to get excited about the upcoming baseball season. Details the 1946 season and the beginning of the Golden Age of baseball. I loved the layout of the book. Each chapter was a new story that talked about different things that happened as you progress through the season. They were short 5-15 page chapters, so it was easy to read. You never felt like you stopped in the middle of a story. You didn't have to go back to re-read the previous ten pages to make sure you remember where you were [...]

    14. The transition into a peacetime economy was not easyhousing and commodity shortages, veterans coming back to a world of employers not willing to pay a fair wage, African-Americans faced with discrimination is easy to romanticize this time when 'the boys came home', but this is not a realistic way to see postwar America.How baseball reacted reflected the broader society is front and center in this booko many players competing for not enough jobs, dealing with employers not willing to pay them wha [...]

    15. An interesting look inside the 1946 baseball season, the first after the players who had been sent to the military service during WWII returned home, the tentative beginning of Jackie Robinson's ascent into the majors and historical breaking of the color barrier, and the nail-biting World Series between the dominant Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals (and their pennant playoff vs. the Brooklyn Dodgers). Lots of great insight into a number of great ball players, and an excellent retelling [...]

    16. I was absolutely fascinated with this book, even though it was a little slow at times, just by some of the stories of the baseball players coming back from WWII (although there was no mention of HOFer Lt. Col. Jerry Coleman (USMC), the only baseball player to see action in TWO wars). Add in Jackie Robinson in the minor leagues, labor issues, housing and food shortages around the nation, and your eyes open up to some of the things that the nation went through right after WWII.Non-baseball fans ma [...]

    17. I initially enjoyed this book. The first few chapters were interesting and provided a sense of the era. Then the disorganized chapters, disconnected stories, editing flaws overwhelmed me. A chapter entitled "Casualties" is a mishmash of information about the era of air travel versus train for teams followed with stories of wartime injuries. What?!!! The story of Enos Slaughter is, well, slaughtered with disconnected information and forced associations. The author has a great deal of knowledge bu [...]

    18. I enjoyed Weintraub's 'The House That Ruth Built'. This, much the same, a slice of baseball history blended nicely with the social and political shifts of the times. I was most interested in the early days of trying to organize a player's union; the pending elevation of Jackie Robinson and his time in Montreal; and the transition from warfront to ballfield for many of the best in the game. The book is a bit choppy in parts, and I was a bit put off by several references to the GIs as 'doughboys' [...]

    19. I was delighted to receive this book from Giveaway!I read alot of books on history, however I have read very little on sports. I did not realize the connection between WWII ending and baseball and the World Series. This Golden Era time period of Baseball brought a renewal to the American Society after the terrible war and making it one of the greatest sport's period in history.I would totally recommend this book to any History or Sports fan to read.

    20. A review of the 1946 Major League Baseball season as stars come back from the War and the nation begins to remember peacetime. Weintraub necessarily had to select what to write about (teams, players, outside of baseball events) but the scope is so vast, everything seems shallow. Plus Weintraub uses slang expressions (the Fens for Fenway Park, for example) that become distracting. His first book, "The House Ruth Built" is much better.

    21. I enjoyed reading The Victory Season by Robert Weinstraub. This book contained a lot of interesting facts that I wasn't aware of before and introduced me to new baseball players that I had never heard of. It was the perfect book to pick up at night when I wanted to read a little nonfiction before bed. Thanks to First Reads for a copy of this book.

    22. Not one I would necessarily recommend. Just a long book with a ton of baseball stories. The references to life in the US at the end of WWII were fascinating. Nice perspective on Jackie Robinson's first year with regular ball clubs. Good thing I like reading about baseball game details. How did it get to be May 21st already?

    23. This is an book with some solid insights connecting what was going on in baseball to the transition from a wartime to peacetime economy and the absurdity of segregation after having sacrificed thousands of lives to defeat Hitler. As a narrative of a season, it never really came together in part because of all of the side trips into social-cultural analysis.

    24. I won this as a giveaway. It was a lot different than I expected. I found a lot of the stories to be kind of dull. My favorite ones were with Jackie Robinson. It was a book that was very slow to read for me as I read two other books while reading this one. It was good but kind of slow paced for me.

    25. first rate; fun facts in every chapter wwII ends and the boys come home to the country and game they love all-time great players, an edge-of-your-seat season, unprecedented social change and just about everything that was good about the game of baseball

    26. The rich history, and the tales of these men, who were both part of baseball's Golden Age and the Greatest Generation , was quite good. It's a very unique look at the war for these men, and the unique struggles of post-war, post-New Deal America.

    27. An excellent read for any baseball fan, particularly those of us who enjoy baseball history. The book takes a remarkable season and puts into a larger, historical context. It also fits well with the recent "42" movie.

    28. This is a fine book for baseball fans, especially those with an interest in its history. The author does a good job of giving the reader a sense of the lived experience of the players and fans coming out of the war.

    29. liked it a great deal-especially the untold stories of ballplayers (major or minor) whose stories of bravery in battle are now forgotten. also like some of the statistical references to today's metrics and how the players of 1946 compare to today's players.

    30. I love baseball, the history and current teams (Blue Jays are my team). I love baseball. This book does an excellent job of placing the history of baseball into the context of American 20th Century history (mainly WWII). Well written and well researched. An excellent read

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