The Purple Land

The Purple Land First published in The Purple Land was the first novel of William Henry Hudson author of Green Mansions The Anglo Argentine naturalist distinguished himself both as one of the finest craftsmen

  • Title: The Purple Land
  • Author: William Henry Hudson
  • ISBN: 9781426421549
  • Page: 208
  • Format: Paperback
  • First published in 1885, The Purple Land was the first novel of William Henry Hudson, author of Green Mansions The Anglo Argentine naturalist distinguished himself both as one of the finest craftsmen of prose in English literature and as a thinker on ecological matters far ahead of his time The Purple Land is the exuberant, often wryly comic, first person account ofFirst published in 1885, The Purple Land was the first novel of William Henry Hudson, author of Green Mansions The Anglo Argentine naturalist distinguished himself both as one of the finest craftsmen of prose in English literature and as a thinker on ecological matters far ahead of his time The Purple Land is the exuberant, often wryly comic, first person account of a young Englishman s imprudent adventures, set against a background of political strife in nineteenth century Uruguay Eloping with an Argentine girl, young Richard Lamb makes an implacable enemy of his teenage bride s father Leaving her behind, he goes ignorantly forth into the interior of the country to seek his fortune and is eventually imprisoned and persecuted by the vengeful father His narrative closes as he sets off on still another impetuous quest This facsimile of the 1904 Three Sirens Press edition includes striking woodcuts by Keith Henderson illustrating the characters in the novel and the fauna of Uruguay Ilan Stavans s introduction offers an opportunity to revisit The Purple Land as a road novel in which an outsider offers reflections on nationality and diasporic identity The Americas, Stavans, series editor with a new introduction by Ilan Stavans.Author Biography W H Hudson 1841 1922 was born in Buenos Aires to American parents He spent his youth in South America before emigrating to England in 1870 His books include the acclaimed novel Green Mansions , The Naturalist in La Plata , Idle Days in Patagonia , Adventures among Birds , A Crystal Age , A Shepherd s Life , Far Away and Long Ago , and A Hind in Richmond Park.

    One thought on “The Purple Land”

    1. La terra rossa è la “Banda Oriental” (Uruguay). Una terra aspra ma suggestiva, ricca solo di pascoli e mandrie contesa per lungo tempo tra spagnoli e portoghesi, poi da argentini e brasiliani, infine da fazioni interne appoggiate ora dall’una ora dall’altra parte degli originali contendenti, con breve apparizione anche degli inglesi tra i perenni litiganti, in difesa dei loro interessi in Argentina (dove combatterono più a lungo), e ai quali rimarrà solo l’eredità delle isole Falkl [...]

    2. William Henry Hudson, maestro romántico de la gauchesca sin ser gauchesca.Guillote Ricky Hudson, para los amigos. De pie.

    3. The first novel by W. H. Hudson, The Purple Land is a fictionalization of his experiences in Uruguay, then referred to simply as the Banda Oriental, or the Eastern Sector. It tells the story of a young married man who is forced by circumstances to leave home to work on a distant estancia. There he quickly gets into trouble and moves on, slowly making his way back to the capital, Montevideo. Along the way, he is involved in a number of adventures with women who fall in love with him (he does not [...]

    4. Mentioned by Hemingway in "The Sun Also Rises" as "a very sinister book if read too late in life, recounting the splendid imaginary amorous adventures of a perfect English gentleman in an intensely romantic land, the scenery of which is very well described."In these scenic descriptions you can see the echoes of Hemingway's own descriptive genius which bore fruit in the Nick Adams stories -- in particular, in Big Two-Hearted River -- as well as in his depictions of Spain and fishing on the Irati. [...]

    5. Saturday Play - Andrew Davies' rip-roaring treatment of WH Hudson's South American classic. blurb - Published in 1885, The Purple Land was the first novel of William Henry Hudson, author of Green Mansions. The Anglo-Argentine naturalist distinguished himself both as one of the finest craftsmen of prose in English literature and as a thinker on ecological matters far ahead of his time.In Davies' hands this 'road novel' becomes a fast paced romp in the tradition of Tom Jones, with a dash of Don Qu [...]

    6. A hilarious, tongue-in-cheek coming of age story set in Uruguay. The opening paragraphs are among the greatest I've ever read. It ranks with Ford Maddox Ford's "The Good Soldier" in terms of duplicity. The rest of the narrative doesn't quite live up to its early promise. It turns into a picaresque novel where the hero bumbles on from one adventure to the next with little to show for added wisdom. The prose is wonderful, some episodes are worth reading for themselves even though what they contrib [...]

    7. This fictional account of the adventures of one Richard Lamb, fish-out of-water Englishman in 1860s Uruguay was originally published in 1885. I liked its overtly flowery language which immediately transported me back to the era and made Lamb's constant attitude of 'I'm English therefore ' easier to stomach. The adventures themselves are entertaining and perilous for our hero, and also generally caused by his falling for the most recent woman to cross his path. The descriptions of Uruguay and her [...]

    8. The story of an Englishman who elopes with an Argentine girl and heads of to Uruguay, where he leaves her in Montevideo to head for the interior seeking his fortune. Finding adventures, yet trouble at every stop, he discovers a long line of women who seem to fall in love with him testing his virtue, and his love for his new bride. Reading this, you could be forgiven for thinking there is not an unattractive woman in all of the interior of Uruguay!Well written, and containing stories inside the s [...]

    9. From BBC Radio 4 EXtra:Andrew Davies' rip-roaring adaptation of WH Hudson's epic Uruguayan adventure. Richard Lamb (David Tennant) elopes with Paquita and tries to survive in this revolutionary land.

    10. Me encantan los relatos de viajes y éste, ambientado en el Uruguay del siglo XIX, tiene la particularidad de hacerte sentir y comprender la vida de ranchos, caballos y pulperías. Su mérito está en no centrarse en la descripción de un lugar específico como pequeña muestra de un todo cultural, sino en que el protagonista, un inglés de origen pero ya con el lenguaje local (aunque el autor, en realidad, haya nacido en Argentina pero de familia inglesa) se mueve constantemente de rancho en ra [...]

    11. I cannot emphasise how much more enjoyable a book becomes when "big words" (simply put) are not the main ingredients when creating a story that is meant to entice it readers. W. H. Hudson surely wrote a book that makes me wonder if he had me in mind, since I feel a lot of similarities with Sir Richard Lamb.The way Richard acts in prickly situations that he gets himself into, I find as comically ironic. Despite his many curses that he lays on (seemingly) all of "La Gente Oriental" for their way o [...]

    12. In one of the finest literary craftsmanships that I have come across so far, W.H.Hudson writes the fictional account of his adventurous journey through Banda Oriental (Uruguay) back in 1870s. More than the land itself and the flora and the fauna, he fell in love with the folks of the land. Their plain and welcoming nature. He writes "If this absolute equality (in purple land) is inconsistent with perfect political order(according to England), I for one should grieve to see such order established [...]

    13. An adventure through Uruguay as it was convulsed through revolutions at the turn of the century. I picked up this book after seeing a famous reference by Hemingway in The Sun Also Rises. I was not disappointed, and the novel, like the character in Hemingway's novel, Robert Cohn, made me feel like going to Uruguay for an adventure. The story is about Richard Lamb as he looks for gainful employment at ranches and estancias in the interior of Uruguay. It's more than that, though, since it traces th [...]

    14. I was curious to read a novel set in Uruguay by an English author that was published in 1885, but could not hack it. Skipping to the end I see that he tries to be critical of the attitude of English superiority, but only manages to come across as condescending in spite of himself (at least, that is how it seems to me). I got over a hundred pages in before giving up, but just could not go on. Guess the English are best appreciated at home, when they are mocking themselves. I might try reading som [...]

    15. The full title pretty much sums up the theme. Written in 1885, set in Uruguay around 1870, expect gauchos, rebels, cows, plains, gnarled old men and pretty girls who all fall for the narrator. Interesting English man abroad type of book, starts by lamenting the lack of order that English colonisation would have brought, ends by singing the praises of the egalitarian gaucho spirit (and the protection of a British passport).

    16. a strange romantic tale. richard is a fish out of water who looks down on the natives he encounters and in all things considers himself superior. the story he tells though reveals a type understanding greater than his own until the very end. the stories he tells and hears demonstrate a very colonial attitude that simultanously praises and abhors the natives. overall an exciting adventure that reads a little clumsily through a 21st century lens.

    17. “Quando verranno le lunghe sere d’inverno, e avrò molto tempo a disposizione, scriverò la storia dei miei vagabondaggi nella Banda Oriental, e il mio libro voglio intitolarlo La Terra Rossa, perché per un paese così inondato dal sangue dei suoi figli non credo che si possa trovare nome più adatto”.

    18. Overall, not a painful read and it has its moments of sincere genius. And in the right frame of mind I even found it spellbinding. But it IS uneven and prone to self-indulgence. Like many others I came to this book because of Hemingway's 'the Sun Also Rises' and it led me on to Conrad's 'the Secret Agent'. So in that respect it was a welcomed gift.

    19. This was just an all around cool book. You feel like you are right there going along for the wild ride in the Banda Oriental.

    20. Meh, it was ok. Funny at points, but mostly I shook my head a ton because Mr. Lamb was so foolish & naive. LOL

    21. Very captivating story. Hemingway recommended this to me through The Sun Always Rises. I enjoyed the authors' way of writing.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *