Fan Cultures

Fan Cultures Fans are one of the most widely studied groups of media consumers Often knowing about a character or series than the star or program makers themselves and ready to make active sometimes surprising r

  • Title: Fan Cultures
  • Author: Matt Hills
  • ISBN: 9780415240253
  • Page: 126
  • Format: Paperback
  • Fans are one of the most widely studied groups of media consumers Often knowing about a character or series than the star or program makers themselves, and ready to make active, sometimes surprising readings of plot lines and characters, they are the ultimate active audience.Fan Cultures is the first comprehensive overview of fans and fan theory Emphasising the contFans are one of the most widely studied groups of media consumers Often knowing about a character or series than the star or program makers themselves, and ready to make active, sometimes surprising readings of plot lines and characters, they are the ultimate active audience.Fan Cultures is the first comprehensive overview of fans and fan theory Emphasising the contradictions of fandom, Matt Hills outlines the ways in which fans have been conceptualised in cultural theory and challenges many of these established paradigms Hills draws on case studies of specific groups, such as Elvis impersonators, X Philes and Trekkers, and discusses a range of approaches to fandom Taking all of this into account, he ultimately questions whether the development of new media creates the possibility of new forms of fandom and explores the significance of the term cult for media fans.Matt Hills is Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University He is co editor of Intensities The Journal Of Cult Media intensities.

    One thought on “Fan Cultures”

    1. I've heard this book referred to as a classic of academic fan studies, so felt obligated to bear with it. I have to confess to skimming/skipping most of the back half, however. Much of the book is preoccupied with academic sniping and one-upmanship: given that Hills critiques some of the worst of 1990s postmodernist third-rate claptrap, on the one hand, it's understandable. On the other hand, it's barrel-fishing. Hills is particularly fond of the term "cult," which he claims fans use self-refere [...]

    2. The author explores fandom as a culture from the lens of religion, cult enthusiasm, and psychology. He offers an alternative perspective to the works of other pop culture studies academics. I found his insights about pop culture fandom and religion to be particularly fascinating. This book will give you a lot to consider about how fandom engages pop culture and makes it part of their lives, as well as what can be learned by exploring fandom from disciplines outside the norms of cultural studies. [...]

    3. Hills' book deals little with fandom and members of fandom. Fan Cultures is a a critique of other theorists who have written about fandom and Hills' ideas of how fan cultures can be better theorized. Though he makes some good observations and critiques of other scholars that write on fan cultures, a strong knowledge of both scholarship in this field and fandom itself is necessary to contextualize many of Hills' assertions. A useful text for those involved in fan culture scholarship, but the book [...]

    4. One of the most amazing books that tells you, you are not alone in your endeavours and pursues regarding fandom.

    5. This was more of an overview of theories on fan culture than I wanted it to be. I wish there had been more of Hill's own opinions, research, and theories than there was.

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