A Moon for the Misbegotten

A Moon for the Misbegotten Eugene O Neill s last completed play A Moon for the Misbegotten is a sequel to his autobiographical Long Day s Journey Into Night Moon picks up eleven years after the events described in Long Day s J

  • Title: A Moon for the Misbegotten
  • Author: Eugene O'Neill Stephen A. Black
  • ISBN: 9780300118155
  • Page: 280
  • Format: Paperback
  • Eugene O Neill s last completed play, A Moon for the Misbegotten is a sequel to his autobiographical Long Day s Journey Into Night Moon picks up eleven years after the events described in Long Day s Journey Into Night, as Jim Tyrone based on O Neill s older brother Jamie grasps at a last chance at love under the full moonlight This paperback edition features an insightEugene O Neill s last completed play, A Moon for the Misbegotten is a sequel to his autobiographical Long Day s Journey Into Night Moon picks up eleven years after the events described in Long Day s Journey Into Night, as Jim Tyrone based on O Neill s older brother Jamie grasps at a last chance at love under the full moonlight This paperback edition features an insightful introduction by Stephen A Black, helpful to anyone who desires a deeper understanding of O Neill s work.

    One thought on “A Moon for the Misbegotten”

    1. though written around the same time (1941-43), long day's journey into night was first performed upon the stage some nine years after its sequel, a moon for the misbegotten. the former, eugene o'neill's autobiographical masterpiece, takes place about a decade prior to moon's drama. jim (or "jamie" in journey - both based on o'neill's real-life older brother), now older, cynical, and nearly beaten by life, has all but succumbed to his alcoholism. still plagued (emotionally, that is) by the death [...]

    2. In some ways, I do prefer this sequel to Long Day's Journey into Night. A Moon for the Misbegotten takes place approximately ten years after the events of the former play, focusing on the final days of James Tyrone, Jr, who’s drowned himself in alcohol to help ward off those personal demons that haunted and tormented his memories for all these years. Throughout these years, he’s looked for purity and innocence—a love that he could truly cherish, and seems to have finally found it in the fo [...]

    3. I read this book because I was looking for a quote. There is a source saying the quote I was looking for is from this book. I don't know whether I should trust my eyes or the book, anyway I didn't find it. Eugene O'Neill is the grandpa for American serious drama, but this one I really don't like it. It has too much burden back the scene, too much social and other background. I prefer plot with more dramatic change like Shakespears etc. This one, I read it as if it is a play of Schiller's. But it [...]

    4. I once found this to be a profoundly moving and sensitive play. My consciousness has been raised, for it now seems wrongly male-centric. The story is all about Jamie and his needs, not Josie and hers, which are just as valid. I judge it from a perspective alien to the time when the work was written and so can be generous with the star parts, but this now seems a male fantasy in which this women is used just like the whores James has always used, only chastely, for forgiveness. Unlike the whores, [...]

    5. I read "Moon for the Misbegotten" for an online literature course. It's a short play, written by Eugene O'Neill in the 1940s about a large, in-control, basically good-willed and good-humored woman named Josie who works beside her father on their farm, though she's actually much stronger than he is. Her younger brothers have all run off (with her help) because they can't stand working under their ill-tempered and often drunk father. Josie, who proudly (and to my amusement) proclaims herself a slu [...]

    6. What struck me the most about this play was Josie; the oldest daughter was very big and broad and yet still described and beautiful. She was an Irish woman and very rough. She didn’t take much crap from nobody. She even knew how to put her daddy in place. I liked that she didn’t let anybody step on her just because her family didn’t have a lot of money. She did what she wanted to do and she wasn’t a wild a child she was very smart and knew right from wrong. After I got through reading ov [...]

    7. This one stuck with me (I read it in high school) for some reason. Maybe it's because it's a pretty decent portrait of a high spirited but yet pretty anxious woman stuck in a patriarchal and gossipy small town. O'Neill reads as pretty melodramatic to me now, but it was pretty innovative to show characters unable to get out of their miserable circumstances and succumbing to despair. Compare to 1940s Hollywood where even the most dramatic scripts have relatively happy endings.

    8. I love Jamie Tyrone in Long Day's Journey into Night, and was really excited when I discovered he got another a play!ah, no. Just stick with Long Day's Journey.

    9. While it doesn't live up to Long Day's Journey Iito Night, it is a good play that is able to evoke both humor and a great deal of emotion even if it veers in melodrama at points. A Moon for the Misbegotten evokes a wonderfully playful and warm Irish banter between father and daughter that is a joy to read. In addition the other character of the play, Tyrone's interactions with Josie manage to be both somber and sensual as only O'Neill can evoke. However, the dialogue does not quite live up to it [...]

    10. Absolutely amazing. It's incredible that this was technically a sequel for Long Day's Journey Into Night, but that it came out first because O'Neill didn't want LDJiN to be published until decades after his death. I recommend reading Long Day's Journey first and then this, because it really provides a great background for the character of Jim Tyrone. Also, Josie is now one of my favorite fictional characters and she would definitely identify as a sex-positive feminist who could murder any man sh [...]

    11. A drunken farmer and his daughter are threatened when their landlord, who loves the daughter, appears to be preparing to sell the farm out from under them. The daughter plays the landlord and the father plays the daughter. No one wins. Another Eugene O'Neill work where the main players are alcoholic, the relationships are toxic and the play just ends. The interaction between the daughter and her suitor lanlord have some hope for redemption. But both are so broken by life that it ends without res [...]

    12. People just don't write plays like this anymore.A sequel of sorts to "Long Day's Journey," this play focuses on the tenant farmer of the Tyrone family. His daughter, Josie, is one of the all time great roles.

    13. A powerful sequel to O'Neill's powerhouse, "Long Day's Journey Into Night" that head fakes the reader/viewer with broad comedy before stealthily pivoting to wrenching emotional drama. Great work that is worth a read and/or viewing.

    14. would that there were more books like this. A lot said in just a few words with plenty of ideas to think about afterward.

    15. Small tragedy of three people. I need to catch-up on O'Neill's writing more. As a total novice to his work, this was not that catchy for me.

    16. This is probably my favorite of the O'Neill plays I've read so far. In my opinion, Long Day's Journey Into Night, while focusing on some of the same themes as this play, was slightly more tedious because it only focused on those themes (This is NOT to say that it wasn't an absolutely great play as well - just slightly less great than this one). A Moon for the Misbegotten, on the other hand, also had an element of comedy in the bantering back and forth between Josie and her father. Then this come [...]

    17. I wasn't sure what to expect from this play, but was pleasantly surprised. I had to read it over the weekend for a class. The assignment was to pick an American Realist author and perform a scene from one of his/her plays. I thought the realist period ended in the late 1800s, but apparently it continued on past the moderns and almost into the contemporaries. I'd heard of O'Neill's plays, but never read any and was especially apprehensive to read this considering I hadn't read its prequel, A Long [...]

    18. This play is a touching and unconventional love story. It is far too long - O'Neill could have condensed Act Two into two lines of dialogue ("I have discovered X at the bar, and we should respond by doing Y." "OK.") and merged it into Act Three. Instead, Act Two is an interminable dialogue in which one character repeatedly makes reference to something he doesn't want to say, then his daughter pries it out of him, when it was obvious to the reader all along. It showcases a little of the relations [...]

    19. I saw a revival in 1984 with Kate Nelligan and Ian Bannen on Broadway. Kate Nelligan did an excellent work bringing the role to life. I sat behind Meryl Streep and her husband in one of the rows near the front of the orchestra. Afterwards Meryl went backstage to congratulate Kate on her performance, and to tell her in person that she had got the role of Susan Traherne in the film adaptation of David Hare's play "Plenty". A role which Kate had played magnificently in the theater. A role which wou [...]

    20. A- This is a equal to Long Day's Journey into Night. Jamie Tyrone is a well-to-do drunk who is back home from NYC where he's a bit actor at times. The Irish Harpers? live on a farm owned by the estate, which Jamie has promised the nasty father he can buy for 2K. Dtgr Josie is large abad ungainly, says she's been with a ton of men in the village which turns out to be a lie. Weird dynamic between father and daughter. All the sons have run away to get away from the mean father with Josie's help. Th [...]

    21. I read this play as part of a literature class during college. We also read A Long Day's Journey Into Night. That play speaks stronger to me than this one. Still, along with my favorite O'Neill play, The Iceman Cometh, this work comprises some of the best American drama I've ever read. O'Neill takes his time, sets up powerful moods, and then plays the richly developed characters off each other again and again. It's heartrending to me, but in a way that feels healthy and profound to take in via t [...]

    22. Josie is a strong woman who’s not like your average girl: she’s a loud mouth, she drinks, and she does intensive labor for her father. However, she willingly looks for love from Jim Tyrone, the owner of the property she and her father live on. Both she and Phil Hogan plan on forcing Jim to not sell the land under them, but that plan starts to chance as both Jim and Josie open up together one night.I found this story to be pretty interesting. I loved how the characters were developed and the [...]

    23. A sequel of sorts to Long Day's Journey Into Night, and the main drama takes place over one night to morning as well. So "A Long Night's Journey into Day"? (sorry)A little too harsh to be a comedy and a little light to be one of his overwhelming tragedies - I can see why it didn't go over too well. It would take a focussed directorial hand to figure out the balance to go for on this. O'Neill did branch out of the tavern for this one, but he makes up for it with gargantuan amounts of drinking in [...]

    24. I read Long Day's Journey into Night a few months prior to this play, and while I loved/related to Long Day's Journey more, this is a great play and O'Neill creates/uses beautiful characters. I appreciate literature that shows how families really are, and not this family-portrait type of structure that we are convinced we have to have to be acceptable within society. However we deal with each other, the bond is usually still there, as seen with Josie and her father.Also, I find nothing more trag [...]

    25. Initially I was really annoyed that a major event in the first act (Hogan and Josie confronting Harder) was obviously the same event Edmund told the Tyrones about in the first act of Long Day's Journey into Night (which takes place years before Moon). Moon is supposed to be the concluding arc of Jamie/Jim's story, and the slip in continuity bugged me because I see no reason for it and I can't see it as an accidental mistake. That's what stopped me from giving it five stars.On the other hand, Jos [...]

    26. A sequel of sorts to “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” although it has a none of that play’s unrelieved melancholy and air of inevitable doom. In “Moon,” guilt-ridden, whisky-soaked, self-imploding Jamie Tyrone fumbles toward, if not redemption, at least absolution, in the arms of Earth Mother Josie Hogan, one of the great female roles in the theater (if you're Colleen Dewhurst). What begins in the tones of rural Irish-American comedy ends in pathos so sweetly sublime it puts this pla [...]

    27. read long day's journey first - I don't think it would be half as good without it. again bleak, but lovely stage directions and scenes, empathetic characters, sneakiness. o'neill does a very good job of writing 3 dimensional female roles, with believable motivation and back story. capital R romantic swagger, right into an early grave, but you can picture the elegant but threadbare suit and the heavy glass tumbler that took him there.

    28. Amen, Alisha. Josie definitely made this worthwhile. I felt like O'Neill was surprisingly insightful with her (don't know why I say "surprisingly," but still). I kept thinking of seeing this on stage, however, and I think I would have HATED it. The reading it was so much better than the performing it would have been, I think. Am I wrong here?

    29. This play, for me, is both wonderful and terrible to read after Long Day's Journey into Night because in this play, Jamie (James grown up) is hoplessly headed toward an alcoholic grave. But Josie, the hadscrabble farmer's daughter, provides a large bosom for him to cry on and is the lap for the famous Pieta scene.

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