Many Dimensions

Many Dimensions I shouldn t think he did the General Secretary answered If I hadn t always found you a very reliable fellow and if it wasn t for Lord Arglay I met him once on a Commission and he seemed a very level

  • Title: Many Dimensions
  • Author: Charles Williams
  • ISBN: 9781419132476
  • Page: 162
  • Format: Paperback
  • I shouldn t think he did, the General Secretary answered If I hadn t always found you a very reliable fellow and if it wasn t for Lord Arglay I met him once on a Commission and he seemed a very level headed sort of man But this No, I won t The whole thing s too ridiculous But what the devil can it be they ve got hold of Tell me all about it again.

    One thought on “Many Dimensions”

    1. "Many Dimensions" was published shortly after "War In Heaven" and while it is quite different it is equally fine. The major difference would be that "War In Heaven" is a Christian religious fantasy centring on The Holy Grail. "Many Dimensions" is a spiritual fantasy using as its focus a strange stone with other-worldly powers originally possessed by Suleiman the Magnificent. Further the cast of characters involves Hajji, an Islamic Persian ambassador, who plays a not insignificant part in the pl [...]

    2. There really isn't anything like this novel. Christianity permeates the writing without intruding--the most Christian character is anagnostic, followed by a Muslim. The goal is to submit to God as He presents Himself to you, in this case, as a fragment of the First Matter from which the cosmos was made. How Williams turns such a theological, abstract concept into a page-turner is beyond me, but I couldn't put it down.

    3. Many Dimensions, is my second William’s novel; Descent Into Hell was first. It wouldn’t be fair for me to compare the two as reading Williams has been an education for me. Although a member of the Inklings—that 1940’s group of British Christian writers including: J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Roger Lancelyn Green, Owen Barfield, and others—Williams has his own way of writing and friendship with those other well-known authors doesn’t mean he thought, believed or wrote like they did. His [...]

    4. This is am amazing novel! It is much more lively and engaging than some of CW's other, more obscure, works. Please check out my post about it, here: theoddestinklingmiddleearth.

    5. Charles Williams is in a special category. He was friends with C.S. Lewis, Tolkien, W.B. Yeats, possibly a member of The Order Of The Golden Dawn. He wrote a series of novels that are about supernatural events and objects. His language at times becomes elegiac; it soars with a glowing passion. Each novel touches on an archetypal subject: The Holy Grail, The Tarot Cards, The Stone From King Solomon's Crown (The Tetragramatton). In fact, the latter is the subject of "Many Dimensions". The Stone co [...]

    6. Most people will tell you that this book is “different,” and I agree, but that is leaving out brilliant, imaginative, powerful, incisive, witty, and—at times—frightening. This story about a mysterious stone possessing mysterious powers will remind modern readers of Tolkien’s One Ring masterpiece, although its author Charles Williams (like Tolkien, a member of the Inklings) actually published his work six years before Gandalf knocked on Bilbo’s green door. Steeped in Scripture, fantas [...]

    7. Lovely Charles Williams doesn't sacrifice any of his characters for mere plot. Poor peripheral Pondon may be lost in yesterday, but Williams is not Tumulty and so Pondon doesn't just vanish from the story. The vast shelves of my favorite used bookstore are crammed with fantasies and thrillers of people knowing what is right, knowing what to do, reclaiming a sacred object, fulfilling some task, restoring justice but this is the one I cried out when I saw who wrote it. The story, for Williams, is [...]

    8. Charles Williams is not an approachable author. His books are difficult and weird. They generally become clear only on multiple re-reads. I think, though, that they are very much worth the time.

    9. Having already read the two Charles Williams books that bracket Many Dimensions chronologically--War in Heaven and The Place of the Lion--I can see how this book sits along a continuum between them in terms of their ideas and the quality of the writing. As such, I rate Dimensions as a solid 3.5 stars. The Stone of Suleiman is a more coherent plot device than his Graal but still suffers from some consistency problems due to its physical nature that Williams' avoids entirely in Lion by discarding [...]

    10. This is, I think a lesser work of Williams'. In a sense it is more like War in Heaven than his later works, in that though it involves the intrusion of the supramundane into the mundane world, it is much more about the machinations of various people in the way they respond to this than it is about the supramundane itself. So, whereas, say The Place of the Lion confronts us with the ultimate reality and forces a complete revaluation in its face, and Descent into Hell shows us the total disintegra [...]

    11. What a treasure I have found in Charles Williams! Though, did I expect anything less from a guy who regularly shared story ideas, philosophy, and theology with JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis? This is as deep as deep gets and funny enough to have me laughing out loud a few times. Does it read like anything from his famous contemporaries? It's certainly no Tolkien but it does bare some similarities to CS Lewis' stranger stuff such as Till We Have Faces, The Dark Tower, and That Hiddeous Strength. This s [...]

    12. Williams is the least known of the Inklings, the group of writers who met weekly in a pub in Oxford. (The others are C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Dorothy Sayers.)Like Lewis, he was a devout Christian, and all his novels, adult fantasies, are written to teach something. His background is complex, though. He was active in several esoteric groups for years before committing to Christianity and I find the influence those teachings as dominant as the Christian themes in his books.Many Dimensions i [...]

    13. Charles Williams' books were amongst the few I kept aside when I disposed of most of the roughly 6000 hard-copy book library prior to moving just over a year ago. My copy of Many Dimensions bears my name and the year I bought it - 1968. It paid re-reading. I found the language less dense than that in my rereading of The Place of the Lion - or perhaps the density was more fitting and acceptable in the context of the philosophy and theology of this narrative. I am attracted to the metaphysical und [...]

    14. As with other Williams novels I've read its very tough going - hopefully at the end it will have been worth the effort! I'll probably have to read the explanation of Thomas Howard to figure out what I read and missed! I'm almost done and haven't "gotten it" much yet. Am I that dense or was Williams a bad writer? I think I got more in the course of reading from "The Place of the Lion" and "Descent into Hell" than from this one - maybe they were better written. I'd like to see the movie versions o [...]

    15. This book is amazing. Fans of Lewis' That Hideous Strength will really enjoy this. It turns out That Hideous Strength is Lewis' attempt to write like Williams. The writing is a little vague at times, but in terms of general mood and concepts conveyed this is really something. All the symbolism and literary references make my head spin. I can't wait to get my hands on every one of Williams' novels.

    16. When taking creative writing in college I remember my professor stating, "Don't tell me the story. Show me the story!" In that sense, I love how Williams lays out his characters with all blemishes showing and depends on the judgement of the reader to draw their conclusions. His command of words and the clarity with which he demonstrates complex ideas is astounding.

    17. Charles Williams rocks my world. Every time I re-read this book I am inspired to think beyond my temporal surroundings.

    18. It was interesting how a stone with mythical powers could be at the center of a fight between good and evil. The author draws on religious differences and the struggle for each sect to gain an advantage and promote their own way as the one true way. Mixed in with some philosophical debate between predestination and free will, is a bit of time traveling. Interactions between governments add another layer to the discussion.I received this book through a Publisher's promotional giveaway. Although e [...]

    19. This was an absolutely amazing book: it was a great follow-up to War in Heaven (though is also a standalone), and I really look forward to reading more of Williams' books!! The way he combines quaint British towns and people and ancient artifacts is just so entertaining and insightful. The characters were very enjoyable to read about and the mystery of the Stone (Solomon's stone) was an excellent focal point for the story that made it very interesting throughout.

    20. The main supernatural phenomenon in this book by Williams seems even a little more far-fetched than his other works. However, after willingly suspending disbelief, it's an interesting exploration of what effects such an artifact might have. I especially liked the resolution in the end.

    21. Нечто среднее между Мамлеевым и Вудхаузом (sic!). Местами нудно, но описания трансцендентных состояний все кажутся убедительными.

    22. Sir Giles, that cheerful Diabolic scientist from War in Heaven, has found a Stone. This stone can let people time travel, teleport through space, heal the sick, and kill people dead with lightning. It also can self-replicate, and as the copies are given to people, they each have to deal with what the mystery it contains is.This book annoyed me to no end. This is the second book of his I've read, after War in Heaven, and I'm already seeing a pattern:1. Powerful artifact that is essentially neutra [...]

    23. This is my first Charles Williams novel; I intend to read more.Williams was a member of the Inklings, the Christian writers group which included CS Lewis and JRR Tolkien. Religiosity permeates this novel, but Williams doesn't bash you over the head with it or preach. He was the weirdest and most unorthodox member of the Inklings; the most 'Christian' characters in this novel are either agnostic or Muslim. The story concerns a magic stone with various powers, including the ability to duplicate it [...]

    24. The second book by Charles Williams shows many of the unique qualities that stood out in the first, and it is better written and easier to read, yet it just gets three stars from me while the first got four. There's a lot to like here: a supernatural artifact that is a character rather than a MacGuffin; a resolution that is more along the lines of virtue and spirit than it is about cleverness and brawn, in fact, that is more about weakness than it is about strength; and some very interesting the [...]

    25. Sometimes we are so confident that our human understanding has captured the essence of God, who is Mystery. The brilliance of books like this is in the use of metaphor and allegory to make some attempt to bring a new light of understanding to the God who has become all too familiar to us. Here we have the Stone (always capitalized whenever it appears) that represents the power of the universe, to be used for either ill or good. On the surface, this might appear to be just another fantasy novel t [...]

    26. I would have liked this better if it would have stuck to the story. There was too much time spent on philosophy and theory. I guess I was lazy and didn't want to look deeper and find hidden meanings. It would have been fun to read in college where I could have discussed the fine details with other students.

    27. This came with one of the blurbiest blurbs I’ve ever read:'[Williams writes] Serious, mystical books containing visionary, descriptive passages of great beauty and great power; yet their form is the form of a thriller, and their characters are flesh and blood figures in an ordinary world.'Chapter one describes three men discussing what to do with the crown of King Solomon, stolen from an ancient Persian family, which apparently allows the user to teleport in space and, possibly, time. So much [...]

    28. I'll admit I picked up this book mostly because Charles Williams was a close friend of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. In hindsight, with a comparison like that it's hard to see how I could have avoided being disappointed. Yes, Williams was an Inkling, but his writing is much more philosophical and mystical. That isn't in itself a bad thing-- witness Lewis's magnificent Perelandra-- but the problem is, Many Dimensions isn't nearly as engaging. Granted that it's deep and literary (though, I've hea [...]

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