The Thousandfold Thought

The Thousandfold Thought The Darkness That Comes Before R Scott Bakker s magnificent debut drew thunderous acclaim from reviewers and fellow fantasy authors Readers were invited into a darkly threatening thrillingly imagin

  • Title: The Thousandfold Thought
  • Author: R. Scott Bakker
  • ISBN: 9781585678839
  • Page: 315
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Darkness That Comes Before, R Scott Bakker s magnificent debut, drew thunderous acclaim from reviewers and fellow fantasy authors Readers were invited into a darkly threatening, thrillingly imaginative universe as fully realized as that of any in modern fantasy and introduced to one of the genre s great characters the powerful warrior philosopher Anas rimbor Kelhus,The Darkness That Comes Before, R Scott Bakker s magnificent debut, drew thunderous acclaim from reviewers and fellow fantasy authors Readers were invited into a darkly threatening, thrillingly imaginative universe as fully realized as that of any in modern fantasy and introduced to one of the genre s great characters the powerful warrior philosopher Anas rimbor Kelhus, on whom the fate of a violently apocalyptic Holy War rests Bakker s follow up to The Darkness That Comes Before, The Warrior Prophet enticed readers further into the richly imagined world of myth, violence, and sorcery The startling and far reaching answers to these questions are brought into thrilling focus in The Thousandfold Thought, the conclusion to The Prince of Nothing trilogy Casting into question all the action that has taken place before, twisting readers intuitions in unforeseen directions, remolding the fantasy genre to broaden the scope of intricacy and meaning, R Scott Bakker has once again written a fantasy novel that defies all expectations and rewards the reader with an experience unlike any to be had in the canon of fantasy literature.

    One thought on “The Thousandfold Thought”

    1. This review applies to all three volumes of Bakker's 'The Prince of Nothing' series. First off, let me say that I'm really impressed with what Bakker achieved here. I'm reminded of something Guy Kay said when asked why he wrote The Fionavar Tapestry about wanting to prove that there was still life in the old tropes of high fantasy, as designed by Tolkien, and that new things could be done with them as opposed to mere slavish imitation. I think Bakker succeeded admirably in this (whereas Guy Kay' [...]

    2. Observational aside: I will rarely reread books. Once I finish a book it is usually off to the next one, with few exceptions. In this case the sixth book in the series, The Great Ordeal, is coming out soon, a book I have waited nearly five years for, and I wanted to give myself a refresher on the entire series before it was released. I don't recall the first time I read "The Prince of Nothing" trilogy but assures me it was before I joined this website. Since then I have read literally hundreds [...]

    3. From the very first book, I suspected that I would reach a point where I could no longer stand the parts that I don't like about Bakker's writing style. I was surprised that I made it through two books, actually, with the second book being excellent in spite of its raging Kellhus-ness.I plugged away at this third book over several weeks and I still only made it halfway through. I have abandoned the pursuit. I cannot take it any more. I cannot stand the pretentious philosophical stuff that permea [...]

    4. What a disappointing ending to an otherwise promising trilogy. Bakker almost abandons the Holy War until the very end then wraps it up in a somewhat disjointed and confusing finale that lacks any depth of understanding. Instead, the reader is subjected to a cerebral cacophony of redundant "mumbo-jumbo" that really seems to beg the question of the story, especially the importance of Khellus' father. By the end of the story, it seems Bakker is more interested in setting up his next series rather t [...]

    5. A strong conclusion to this epic series. I really enjoyed this book and i'm a huge fan of Bakker's writing style. The story itself was amazing, the plotlines and plot twists, the unexpected happening's here and there, and these very real characters.I also just noticed just how many awesome minor characters there are in the series, characters that are not the center of attention but whose deeds have important impacts nonetheless. Some of these are Earl Athjeari (very resourceful in battle tactics [...]

    6. The first book didn't sell me, but the latter two had me absolutely enthralled. This is a fantasy series that is unabashedly dark -- if you like authors who shy away from the harsh realities of violence, war, and the periods in human history that most fantasy series draw inspiration from, then stay far, far away. If you don't mind that stuff, or if, you find it helps draw you further into the world, I haven't encountered a better dark fantasy series in my lifetime. Glen Cook's Black Company is a [...]

    7. I normally never really dislike books but this series takes the cake. It's not about it's writing or really it's plot; I absolutely hate these characters.First off we have Kellhus or should I say Gary Sue to match all of Gary Sues. I get it, he's suppose to be inhuman in intellect and reading people. I get it after being hit over the head after every description that he's like no other man, he's so smart, he's so observant. He has intellect and skill, he talk and he can fight. More toward the th [...]

    8. This was a GRANDIOSE epilogue to an amazing saga. Don't expect me to properly review the book because I would end up spoiling the whole thing. Trust me on this one, it was bloody good, that's all. Oi, Vlad, what do you think mate? Exactly.

    9. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Bakker's style has a number of strengths which I felt were brought to the fore with this, the last book in the first of three planned trilogies in the world of Earwa. Firstly, the Homeric large-scale battles were depicted quite well, as in The Warrior-Prophet (although toward the end, I was a little tired of the phrase "death came swirling down"). Secondly, Bakker's non-Kellhus characters kept developing in real and believable ways, even though I was a trifle surp [...]

    10. Disappointing end to the trilogy. As a whole the trilogy is good and Bakker creates a wonderfully rich setting. The series was a bit of a roller coaster for me, the first book I gave 4 stars, the second book a 5 stars and regrettably, 3 stars here. The first 1/2 of the book abandoned the Holy War and it wasn't till the 2nd half did it return to it. I guess I just didn't find the character Kelhus compelling enough to warrant moving away from the events of the Holy War. I will say the 2nd half has [...]

    11. 2 Stars After the brilliance of the first two books, this one should have been a knock out. Even after a second read, I could not get over how boring this one was in comparison. Even with some exceptional battles, I had a tough time speed reading this for a second time. I will still move on to the next trilogy as Bakker is an exceptional author. Hopefully I will come back to loving this complex world.

    12. This series is life changing.It ruined other books to me. I am lucky that I am easily pleased with books else there would have been a lot of negative ratings for every other book.

    13. I feel like I have finished reading the bible. That was huge. I need time to put my thoughts together on this.

    14. Ah well, so much for "The Prince of Nothing" trilogy. I loved the first book so much that I suffered through the vastly inferior second, then still forged on with this one. It's not as frustrating as the previous book (for one, the rape has been toned down), but it perpetuates a lot of the same problems.It's easy to capture all the trilogy's problems in one word, and that word is "Kellhus." This character is so bad, he sucks the fun out of the supporting cast. This was painfully true in Warrior [...]

    15. Ohis book. Not only did it take me forever to get through it, but it also left me entirely unsatisfied. About halfway through the book I decided it was only getting two stars (a fantastic final scene in which Achamian finds within him the strong, vicious man I always knew he could be made me consider giving it three, but it just doesn't deserve it).Three books ago, I stumbled upon The Prince of Nothing and was immediately intrigued by its promise of wasted kingdoms, dark history, sorcery, long-f [...]

    16. Alright, this was pretty badass. But it was only PRETTY badass. It could've been DIZ-AMN! Yet it was in fact just, OH, SNAP. Book 1: 600 pages with some fairly dramatic moments, but mostly setting the chess pieces.Book 2: 600 pages. Some very cool dramatic moments, a lot of suffering, some very startling discoveries. Still felt somewhat slow.Book 3: 300 pages more of buildup. Then, 100 pages where everything goes crazy, and bodyparts fly all over the place, and with a flourish, it's over. I gues [...]

    17. Despite the lower rating I don't think this was really much worse than The Warrior Prophet. The difference is that while the previous book took advantage of the momentum of the excellent "The Darkness that comes before", this one suffers from the flatness of its predecessor. I started reading this already fed up with the numerous faults of The Warrior Prophet and all I got was another 500-pages-long serving of them.The characters are stil flat, Kellhus is still awesome in everything, everyone is [...]

    18. Bakker's work continues to constitute the best new fiction I've read in years. The man is a master. It is writing of this caliber that makes life more interesting -- epic fantasy through the filter of philosophy, "Lord of the Rings" for the 21st century adult, sorcery written with the imagination and gift of language to do it justice.UPDATE: Even better the second time through, in part because I wasn't rushed by the need to know what was going to happen. I got to savor the depth more this time a [...]

    19. Many authors over the history of SFF, but especially the last half century, have attempted the saga, a narrative epic stretched across many volumes of books. Arguably, there are many a mythos that have stood the test of a century and more that have anticipated and preceded The Second Apocalypse but few can match the insane talent, training, and ambition of its author, R. Scott Bakker.Spoilers for The Darkness That Comes Before (TDTCB) and The Warrior-Prophet (TWP) below:The Thousandfold Thought [...]

    20. 7/10Coming to the third and final part of the Prince of Nothing series, Bakker sets the bar once again very high, bringing a quite ambitious story that tries to pass much more that what it actually shows as, at the same time, his ideas continuously grow; but even though he partially manages to achieve that, the overall outcome leaves a very “bittersweet” feeling.After a long march, passing through death and despair, the Holy War, now stronger than ever, is led by a living God; a God who will [...]

    21. I've now read this book twice: The second time around I enjoyed it much more than before though I agree with the opinions of a few other readers here on GR that it feels rushed toward the end. I rarely say this about modern SF/Fantasy but the novel could have used 50-100 pages of narrative.The third entry in Bakker's series wasn't as good as the first two but the appendices alone are worth the price of the book (in my opinion).Hopefully, the projected sequels (The Great Ordeal, The Horns of Golg [...]

    22. The long-awaited (and what should have been the final installment in The Aspect-Emperor trilogy, but has since then been split into two volumes) The Great Ordeal by R. Scott Bakker will finally be released this summer. It's been five years since The White-Luck Warrior, the second volume, saw the light, so you can understand why Bakker fans are rejoicing. Problem is, it's been a very long time in between books. And for a midlist genre author, one that never was marketed much by his publishers to [...]

    23. R. Scott Bakker take a bow! I have literary too much to gash about this book and this series in particular. Probably, the most concise, and one of the best series ever written- I give Malazan and Prince of Nothing at equal step. But, I won't go in a detailed review, and will just say thank you to Mr. Richard Scott Bakker. The author who can move my soul with his mere words.

    24. A riveting final act to a complex and captivating series, The Thousandfold Thought rounds up many of the best elements of the first two books, turns some of them on their ear, and turns the rest up to 11 in delivering a page-scorching conclusion fraught with magic, mysticysm and moments of devastating impact. The weird gets weirder, the crazy gets crazier, the deep gets deeper and the magic getsgicker?! For me the book was roughly divided into thirds. The first part of the story deftly settled t [...]

    25. More of the same rapey fare. This time with a broken plot. And Gary Stu dialed to 12 (book two had it at 11 already).While we are predictably treated to more porn and melodrama, now it's even more obviously sexist.The trend established at the end of the previous book continues as the plot makes less and less sense.Worse, the bizarre events of the end of the second book are not explained here (as I hoped). Quite the contrary, their strangeness is underlined (at least they're not retconned away or [...]

    26. Wow. I cared more about Seswatha than Achamian, and Achamian was by far my favorite character. Kellhus is interesting in the way my Philosophy professor was interesting in College. Then, about half way through the course, the new and fascinating aspects of philosophy fall away and I realized philosophy is eerily familiar to religion. It takes a lot of faith to believe what philosophers are saying and they speak in such a convoluted way that I don't think they fully grasp half the ideas they are [...]

    27. While I enjoyed the trilogy this book is the weakest of them all. What really irritated me all throughout was how repetitive it was. The reader is inundated with how awesome and infallible Khellus is because regular people are like children to him; that Esmi struggles with being a whore (seriously, we got that in the 1st book clearly enough)and how Akka is tormented etc. The battle scenes are also quite a chore to read. It's bunch of random names and peoples who were never properly introduced an [...]

    28. Product Description The conclusion to the groundbreaking epic Prince of Nothing fantasy trilogy.From the Publisher Will Kelhus be able to rise to claim his role within the ascendancy, or will he be overtaken by his enemies--both within and without? Will he reach the ancient city of Shimeh and reunite with his father? Upon the apocalypse, will there be survivors left to write the history of the Holy War? The startling and far-reaching answers to these questions, left hanging at the conclusion of [...]

    29. The philosophical and intellectual aspects of this book are very impressive just like the first two books of the series. I really sympathized with Drusas Achamian, and while Kellhus dropped my jaw in the first two books, I couldn’t help but curse him in this one. The climax scene of Cnaüir was excellent just as I expected. Though the war scenes in Shimeh, especially those involving the sorcerers were unnecessarily long and even boring in a few places, but in general it is a great book.Read my [...]

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