The Abominables

The Abominables A hundred years ago in the Himalayan peaks of Nanvi Dar the daughter of an English earl is kidnapped by a huge hairy monster In a secret valley Agatha Farlingham is introduced to a family of motherl

  • Title: The Abominables
  • Author: Eva Ibbotson
  • ISBN: 9781407132976
  • Page: 486
  • Format: Paperback
  • A hundred years ago, in the Himalayan peaks of Nanvi Dar, the daughter of an English earl is kidnapped by a huge hairy monster In a secret valley Agatha Farlingham is introduced to a family of motherless yetis and devotes her life to their upbringing She teaches them to speak, tells them stories and insists on polite manners But as the decades pass, tourists come to theA hundred years ago, in the Himalayan peaks of Nanvi Dar, the daughter of an English earl is kidnapped by a huge hairy monster In a secret valley Agatha Farlingham is introduced to a family of motherless yetis and devotes her life to their upbringing She teaches them to speak, tells them stories and insists on polite manners But as the decades pass, tourists come to the mountains, a hotel is built and yeti hunters arrive Agatha knows that there is one place in the world where they would be protected her ancestral home at Farley Towers When a boy and his sister stumble upon her hidden valley, she knows she has found the courageous people who will carry out her plan The excited yetis are smuggled into the bridal suite at the hotel A freezer lorry is waiting to put them into semi hibernation on the long trip home But the baby yak that has fallen in love with the youngest yeti foils the refrigeration plan and they set off on a hugely entertaining road trip half way across the world In the Sultan of Aslerfan s kingdom the yetis release all the animals from his zoo In the Alps they rescue a lost child in a blizzard In Spain, the yak creates chaos at a bullfight But when they arrive in England, a terrible shock awaits them at Farley Published posthumously.

    One thought on “The Abominables”

    1. Eva Ibbotson's novels always make my heart sing. No matter what they're about, there's always some indefinable quality of loveliness -- hope and friendship and courage and integrity and beauty. Yes, okay, the bit where (view spoiler)[the Queen saves the day (hide spoiler)] is kind of silly, but I guess it's no less silly than a yeti plaiting the hair on its stomach in order to look pretty.I was determined not to cry when I read this, even if it was the last book Eva Ibbotson ever wrote. But then [...]

    2. There really are yetis, and they need to be saved, because people are encroaching into their territory. So, of course, two clever and resourceful children find a way to save them.If you liked Dial-a-Ghost, then you'll probably like this, too. It shares not only the broad storyline, but that contemporary-yet-somehow-Edwardian feel. I love that: when the kids in the story seem to have few impositions on their time, no team sports, or lessons, just plenty of time to come up with both problems and s [...]

    3. I really don't think there is any way to read this book and not fall completely in love with it. From the very first page my children and I were already laughing and loving the girl who becomes a surrogate yeti mum. This story is so creative. The reasoning the author gives behind why we can't ever track down a yeti is hilarious. For the children, the favourite character here was Hubert the Yak. I can't say as I blame them any, but personally, I loved Ambrose. These are the type of characters tha [...]

    4. Sasquatches are so cool. This is a quirky take on the Bigfoot/AbominableSnowpeople/Yeti/Sasquatch stories, with a very British sensibility. In this case, the Abominables are adorable and guileless and sweet and totally harmless when you get to know them. But human hunters are cruel and terrible and just want to hurt them! So, it's up to a small band of humans to rescue the sweet creatures. Read it in less than a day (on vacation) and took it out to local elementary schools for the SRP. Bigfoots [...]

    5. Karena minggu depan mau siaran yang temanya "Winter Reading Challenge" sehingga gue memilih buku ini. Ya gue pikir "kan di sampulnya ada gambar salju, ya nyambunglah ya sama judulnya." Ternyata enggak nyambung-nyambung amat sih. Ahahahaha Emang sih latar belakang di awal cerita itu di pegunungan bersalju. Selanjutnya mereka berkelana yang pastinya enggak bersalju. Jadi kesimpulannya memang ceritanya bukan ketika musim dingin. Tapi ya udahlah ya terlanjur dibaca dan seru juga ceritanyaBaiklah, be [...]

    6. It pains me to say that I did not enjoy this. So much so that I didn't even finish it. I can only review what I've read, but even that makes me rather sad.Whenever I find out that a book has been published posthumously, I feel rather sad. Unless the manuscript was completely prepped and ready to go with a bow on top, what you are reading is not the purest vision of the author. It's probably been filled in here and there by somebody else.Huh, I just started thinking about that Nickelodeon show Gh [...]

    7. The Abominables by Eva Ibbotson is a children’s chapter book. This is a previously unpublished work from a well known author, following a family of yetis who are forced to leave their home in the Himalayas and make their way across Europe to a possible new home. Siblings Con and Ellen shepherd the yetis along their eventful journey, with the help of Perry, a good-natured truck driver. Through a mountain rescue in the Alps and a bullfight in Spain, the yetis at last find their way to an ancestr [...]

    8. Eva Ibbotson was one of my favorite authors as I child. I first discovered her through a reprint of WHICH WITCH? and quickly devoured all of her other books currently in print. She was like a gentler Roald Dahl, imaginative and funny. She played with the elements of traditional fantasy in a way that made them her own.Now, a posthumous novel THE ABOMINABLES is being released with artwork by Fiona Robinson. Robinson's illustrations are a great match for Ibbotson's words and really express the good [...]

    9. Absolutely delightful little book with surprisingly deep and poignant themes, in the vein of Roald Dahl (albeit without the adulty undercurrent of snark and cynicism present in many of his works). Eva Ibbotson was an extraordinary lady and very lamentably underrated author of children's fiction. I am so pleased that this final work of hers was able to be completed (by Ibbotson's son, who does a beautiful job of capturing his late mother's literary voice and keeping to the spirit of her storytell [...]

    10. Loved it! Ibbotson still remains one of my favorite authors and this book, though published posthumously, had all the charm and wit of her other novels. I also loved the topic of being kind to all creatures and that hunting for sport is quite disgusting. I wish I had a yeti friend or maybe just a simple-minded yak.

    11. So random, and yet it works. Adorable yetis with a weird, clumsy goat pet, an around-the-world adventure, an evil secret hunting club, and kids saving the day.

    12. I love Eva ibbotson. I love the humanity and care in her books. And such great messages for the intended audience of young people. Good always triumphs over evil in her books, and who doesn't love that?! A rollicking tale with heroic children as the main characters. And of course very personable and magical Yetis as the stars. I read her books over and over as they are so rewarding and comforting.

    13. I really enjoyed reading this very entertaining book to my 10 year old son. The is very engaging, and keeps the reader wanting to know what happens to a family of yetis who leave their mountain home in Tibet, to travel to Britain. My son sat still and listened to the story as I read it to him, which can be challenging.

    14. This is my first time read her novel and I just love it. I love children book so much! Simple yet touching. Definitely wants to read this again with my children :p haha except the part of Barbaric Sultan, bc I am muslim, I offended by her thoughts about "Sultan" she mentioned in 2 different part about Sultan, and two of them aren't describes good and yeah of course it can't be generalized.

    15. I read the book as my son couldn’t stop praising the book. He told me many details while giggling. Yes, I love it as well! Three Ibbotson’s books were bought to share with my son!

    16. Librarian suggested this author for my little man. While it did not hold his attention, I enjoyed reading it. A group of yetis steal a young girl to have a mother for their young. The girl becomes a woman and as she ages she is concerned for her "kids". When a young boy stumbles into their secluded mountain home she seizes the opportunity to have him move the yetis to her childhood home. When they arrive in England her home and its grounds are the meeting place for a group of hunters that now wa [...]

    17. A young English Lady is captured by a Yeti to help bring up his children. What a fantastical, Dhalesque idea for a book. I was intrigued and just had to read it. And what a fantastical world Eva Ibbotson created.This beautiful story introduces us to a very different family, a family of yetis. Each has their own personality and traits and each has a big heart. Lady Agatha Farlingham is brought into their lives and brings them up in the best traditions of English children. But yeti’s live for a [...]

    18. "I am not a fan of didactic novels, books with an agenda to teach vs. books that require readers to, oh, I don't know. Become one with the story, or something. Experience the story. I've probably mentioned this bias of mine here before.But I've had to rethink the whole "didactic is bad" thing because of an essay I read at The Horn Book site. In The Campaign for Shiny Futures, Farah Mendlesohn has all kinds of fascinating things to say about YA science fiction. She describes Ender's Game as "the [...]

    19. Meet the yeti family from the Himalayas of Tibet. Father, their strong, proud leader who is over three hundred years old; Uncle Otto, a shy, book lover who is self-conscious about going bald; Grandma, who grumbles about everything but loves to sing and yodel (be sure to cover your ears!), and the three children: Lucy, Clarence, and Ambrose. Lucy is a very large yeti who likes to eat, a lot, and occasionally sleep walks herself into dangerous situations. Clarence’s brain doesn’t work so well, [...]

    20. I was saddened to hear that Eva Ibbotson passed away in 2010. I've enjoyed many of her middle grade novels, especially The Secret of Platform 13, Island of the Aunts, and Journey to the River Sea. The Abominables was her final book, published posthumously after her death.Like Island of the Aunts that had selkies, a boobrie, and mermaids, this book also has magical creatures, in this case, yetis. While on a trip to the Himalayas with her father, young Lady Agatha Farlingham is abducted one night [...]

    21. It's kind of uncanny that this was Eva Ibbotson's last book. It features a very old woman to tells stories to yetis, and the yetis have to leave her and she dies. But at the end a new girl, who looks very much like the very old woman, comes into their lives to tell them stories and take care of them like the very old woman did.Maybe I'm being sappy, or maybe this was Eva Ibbotson saying goodbye, and not to worry because there will be others after her. Maybe I'm just a doofus.

    22. Yetis! One last gem from Eva Ibbotson. Father Yeti takes a young British lady from her tent to look after his 3 young yetis. Lady Agatha brings them up in proper English fashion, and over the years an old yeti - "Grandma" and another yeti "Uncle Otto" also join the family. Now, 100 years later, tourists are coming ever closer to the Yeti's secret refuge and Lady Agatha decides it is best for their safety to send them back to her ancestral estate in England. Con & Ellen's father runs a hotel [...]

    23. This is a beautiful story, following a cleverly designed arc taking us on, what turns out to be, quite a traditional fairy tale journey there and back again. Immediately two of the great Thou Shall Nots of fiction for children are totally ignored and we don't mind at all. Firstly, this is very much tell not show, second, we've got talking mystical creatures, both definite no-no's if you read advice about writing for children. But Ibbotsen is a master and this rule-breaking works very well when y [...]

    24. Two big thumbs up for 'The Abominables'--the recommended age is 8-12 but I'm going to read it to my 2 and 5 year olds as the content is not too scary-- and look for more books by the late Eva Ibbotson (this one was finished posthumously by her son and long time editor). Several seem to be about ghosts and witches, which would be great this time of year. I love the writing style and am going to look for more to pre-read next for kid consumption! Age range: I think my oldest could read this but it [...]

    25. The Abominables by Eva Ibbotson is a children's chapter book that is scheduled for release on October 8 2013. This previously unpublished work from a favorite author, The Abominables follows a family of yetis who are forced to leave their home in the Himalayas and make their way across Europe to a possible new home. Siblings Con and Ellen shepherd the yetis along their eventful journey, with the help of Perry, a good-natured truck driver. Through a mountain rescue in the Alps and a bullfight in [...]

    26. Premise: When a family of yetis, raised by an English girl, is nearly discovered by tourists in the Himalayas, they must move to safety all the way in England. But the journey through Europe isn't the only adventure in store for these yetis, who find that a hunting club is very interested in their arrival.Three adjectives that describe this book: amusing, intriguing, whimsicalEva Ibbotson passed away in 2010, but this novel is being published posthumously by her estate. The Abominables is the fi [...]

    27. Welcome to the world of the Abominables, cuddly giants who live in an unexplored warm valley in midst of the snowy mountains of the Himalayas. As in Island of the Aunts, we start with a kidnapping. I fully expect more complaints about this from concerned adult reviewers as if kids are unable to distinguish between fictional kidnapping to move the plot along and the dangers of a real life kidnapping. Come on, people!Little Lady Agatha Farlingham steps out of her tent when she hears a strange nois [...]

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