Tales of Power

Tales of Power In this astonishing work Carlos Castaneda at last completes the long journey into the world of sorcery that began with his now legendary meeting with don Juan Drawn back by the knowledge that the sor

  • Title: Tales of Power
  • Author: Carlos Castaneda
  • ISBN: 9780671732523
  • Page: 181
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this astonishing work, Carlos Castaneda at last completes the long journey into the world of sorcery that began with his now legendary meeting with don Juan Drawn back by the knowledge that the sorcerer s task has not been completed, Castaneda returns to plumb the final, awesome secrets of the sorcerer s explanation of the world to learn, in don Juan s world and his owIn this astonishing work, Carlos Castaneda at last completes the long journey into the world of sorcery that began with his now legendary meeting with don Juan Drawn back by the knowledge that the sorcerer s task has not been completed, Castaneda returns to plumb the final, awesome secrets of the sorcerer s explanation of the world to learn, in don Juan s world and his own, the last lesson of a unique and arduous apprenticeship For until now don Juan has performed his acts of power in his world, the dry, barren deserts and mesas of his birth, a world in which he seems to exist as naturally as the chaparral and the rocks Now, in an unexpected encounter, don Juan appears in Castaneda s modern urban world, at ease in a well tailored suit, demonstrating his lessons of power in the crowded, busy streets, using the city scene, as he uses everything, to unfold the wings of Carlos Castaneda s perception.

    One thought on “Tales of Power”

    1. I think it is freaking hilarious when people find comfort in "proving" something like this to be a hoax. Even if it is completely what hoaxers say it is(n't?), I fully believe in Oscar Wilde:Now, the value of an idea has nothing whatsoever to do with the sincerity of the man who expresses it.

    2. Awesome. Spectacular. My favorite Carlos Castaneda book by far. The lessons in this book have a similarity to many things I've been discovering lately that I've garnished from many different sources. It doesn't surprise me that philosophies the world over share many things in common. This book makes me want to wander around the deserts of Mexico seeking out a teacher. It also encourages me to be more impeccable and to ground myself out more. My meditations become even more meaningful in light of [...]

    3. I was reading Castaneda books at the age of 15 and i can't put into words how much they impacted me. I was always searching for answers about god and Castaneda series of books explained and delivered it all. But you need to read all of them to understand the whole picture. Many of the Don Juan teachings corelate with modern day quantum physics theories, energy vibrations and law of attraction. I found it fascinating, you can connect them also to many spiritual belifs around the world they are ju [...]

    4. Tales of Power (The Teachings of Don Juan #4), Carlos Castaneda عنوان: افسانه های های قدرت؛ افسانه های قدرت (نخستین حلقه ی قدرت)۰ 1363 انتشارات فردوس ـ ترجمه ی مهران کندری و مسعود کاظمی۰

    5. I read Castaneda's first three books--The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge, '68; A Separate Reality: Further Conversations with Don Juan, '71; Journey to Ixtlan: The Lessons of Don Juan, '72--while on summer break from Grinnell College, one after another. Of the three, I most like The Teachings of Don Juan, his reworked doctoral dissertaion.In the years following I obtained a copy of Tales of Power ('74), fourth book in the series. I also read an article in the NY Times suggesting [...]

    6. I read Castaneda`s books, oh about 30 years ago. They had a big impact on me back then and while I don't think of them consciously now, I KNOW they are part of the ME thats passed through all the filters- and makes up whatever constitutes the deepest part of my being.

    7. The fourth book in Castaneda's tales of Don Juan is a brilliant blend of philosophy and story, somewhat inspired by Native American mysticism but made timeless through expertly woven undertones of eastern philosophy. It is both a weird and inspiring modern myth that pits some of man's most challenging psychological life lessons against the backdrop of a fanciful world of sorcery. Unlike his first three books, the plot here evolves through a connected sequence and in a way such that odd concepts [...]

    8. Encontré este libro muy interesante porque es toda una experiencia sensorial de la cosmogonía milenaria de las culturas indígenas Mesoaméricas, la comprensión del Tonal y del Nagual son conceptos metafísicos de difícil comprensión y determinan en buena parte la temática de este libro. Es sin duda una obra literaria compleja y tremendamente ilustrativa de un conocimiento ancestral con el que sentí gran conexión y simpatía. Me gustaron muchas de sus citas que resalte en mi lectura, el [...]

    9. The books are about consciousness, awareness. The things happened, they didn’t happen, some happened, some didn’t happen – it doesn’t matter. As individuals we each move among many levels of awareness. What can be called real, what we think about it, what we think it is after we process it. What we dream when we are asleep, what we daydream about, the things we carry with us, saved movements in time that are as real in the present as they ever were in the past, all get bundled into what [...]

    10. Es uno de los libros más interesantes de la serie (hasta ahora). Se abren las puertas de lo desconocido para Carlos Castaneda y los conocimientos de los libros anteriores empiezan a unirse, gracias a las explicaciones de Don Juan, a la vez que hace un repaso general de lo que pasó en libros anteriores.

    11. Sometimes I feel that the author is putting me on and other times I am not entirely certain. The author takes me through a convoluted path toward wisdom and hope. I have concluded that factual or fictional, it makes no difference. I try to keep my mind open to new thoughts and possibilities. Carlos presents both.

    12. Got this book in a bag from a friend, I had not heard of this author and his series of books about Don Juan. SHOULD have, since I am of the generation that read them Bill did read them at the time they were published and said they were all the rage back then [late 60s].This is the last of the 4, published in 1974.Many people say the first is the best [The Teachings of Don Juan], it is a revised version of his PhD thesis [anthropology].Some time I will look at that first one to see.This 4th book [...]

    13. This is a book that required a lot of effort to read and understand. Seeing, "seeing," and seeing> are not the same thing, in fact they are drastically different. Almost half the book is devoted to a subject that no rational or irrational thought can explain, and that is not my opinion, it is straight from the book: "The nagual cannot be explained."I found that this is not a series to begin by reading the last book. Much is not explained, as the reader was supposed to read the first three boo [...]

    14. June 2011Another box of books has been reopened for cleaning, sorting, and reevaluation and lo and behold, many of the collected works of Carlos Castaneda are part of the contents.Many years have gone but I remember this author and his works vividly. [Now don't get any ideas as to an allusion I may or may not be making] At some point I stopped purchasing more in the series and put them away. There's a 'blur' factor as I recall that happens with these stories of the metaphysical and magical journ [...]

    15. Last one today: examiner/examiner/x-83I tried reading this after seeing correspondence from Wm. Burroughs to his son in the latter's "Cursed From Birth" saying he liked it much better than Castaneda's previous. I looked C up on and it turns out he ended his days as the leader of a "suicide cult" so-called centered around ancient Toltec exercises he renamed "tensegrity" (I never knew) and that the validity of his books has always been in question, but that Castaneda had taken extreme steps to er [...]

    16. I finished the first four books in the series now. This is by far the best so far. The second book '"A Seprate Reality" had some incredible imagery in it. The third one "Journey To Ixtlan" had some of the best writing up to that point. This combines both of those qualities wonderfully. This one has the best plot, a fantastic section where Don Juan sits Carlito down and explains the unity of his teachings for over twenty pages. He does this becuase his aprentice is now ready for that. He even enc [...]

    17. I am going to give the same review to all the Carlos Castaneda books I read in that series, simply because they are all outstanding. I was lucky to come across Castaneda very early on my magickal path. My spells and rituals have always relied on the power of intent, and I have found no better education on how to focus your intent than in this series of books. Back then (1994) they were classifed as nonfiction. Lately, they say they are fiction. All I know is much of what is in these books works. [...]

    18. These books are essentially a series of journals of Carlos Castaneda`s account of his studying under Don Juan - A Yacqui Indian Shaman.For anyone ever into Psychedelics or Native American Spiritualism ; Carlos Castaneda is undeniably one of the most captivating writers from the 70`s to capture the Imagination of the Dreamquest.These are engrossing reading at their finest.Some have speculated that this was nothing more then a Fictitious account used as a thesis for his Harvard Graduate doctorate. [...]

    19. The book was alright. Beginning was much more interesting than the end to me, because it's less obscure. It's probably better to read his books in sequence, but I started with this one because we had it in the library.There are a lot of things I don't like about his writing, which are all mentioned in other review, however the ideas in the book are interesting enough that the style is not so important. The most important thing besides ideas presented, is how they're explained. This book is very [...]

    20. I've read too many Castaneda books to review each individually, other than to say "I'm sorry I found this so compelling." I have to admit, I was conned.Also of note, is that outside of all the magical ubermensch stuff, the stable human themes are sterility, futility, failure, and survival through blind, dumb luck.Anyone with at least a passing interest in Castaneda's books should read this disillusioning Salon article.

    21. Standard "I read this, but damned if I can remember exactly when or why or enough about it to make detail comments" disclaimer: My rating is based solely on my memory of how much or little I enjoyed the book at that time. In some cases, "at that time" might mean before most users were born. Then again, it could mean a couple years ago and that I have a lousy memory. Your mileage may vary. Heck, given how all our tastes change over the years and the fickle nature of memory, my own mileage might [...]

    22. Castaneda was a graduate student studying Anthropology and was doing his thesis on Mexican Shaman and their use of regional plants and herbs to induce psychotropic effects in an attempt to cure people of various illnesses. Castaneda starts off with a scientist view, as a skeptic and later is blown away by what happens to him, which then becomes his life long pursuits. If you plan on reading these books, start with the Yaqui Way of Life, which is the first book and be prepared to be engrossed in [...]

    23. A philosophy book under the guise of the story about a man learning sorcery. I enjoyed it. I didn't feel like I'd missed anything having not read the previous books. In fact, I didn't know there were others until I started reading this one. Still, the ideas were clear, and it was a pleasant enough read. I liked that it was set in the Mexican desert. I don't know why, but a desert seems to me the most appropriate setting for a magical story set in the 20th century.

    24. A classic, poetic work, whether you categorize it as magic realism, allegory, non-fiction, or hogwash. Carlos walks around in the desert and gets scared to death by the actions of Don Juan. The teacher's explanation of the known ("tonal") and unknowable ("nagual") is original. Don Genaro, Don Juan's friend and fellow sorcerer, provides some bizarre scenes, all of which are perfectly described in eerie realism. At the end, we're left with a sense of detached wonder.

    25. I read all these books when I was a teenager and remember loving them and thus I gave them all 5 stars when popped into my life. But there is no way I could have fully comprehended wtf was happening in these books at 18 because I don't even fully get it now. This one had a few good nuggets for me but so much of the book was about the tonal/nagual distinction and I still have no idea what that is.

    26. All books of Carlos Castaneda are very important to me. He (and his Don Juan), Vadim Zeland - writer from Russia, quantum physicist and Alexey Bachev - an unusual psychologist from Bulgaria, protagonist of my book Life Can Be a Miracle have shaped my way of thinking, perceiving, experiencing the reality. Very grateful for showing me the miraculous way of living!!!!

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