Dust of Life

Dust of Life The Dust of Life is a collection of vivid and devastating oral histories of Vietnamese Amerasians Abandoned during the war by their American fathers discriminated against by the victorious Communists

  • Title: Dust of Life
  • Author: Robert S. McKelvey
  • ISBN: 9780295978369
  • Page: 313
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Dust of Life is a collection of vivid and devastating oral histories of Vietnamese Amerasians Abandoned during the war by their American fathers, discriminated against by the victorious Communists, and ignored for many years by the American government, they endured life in impoverished Vietnam Their stories are sad, sometimes tragic, but they are also testimonials toThe Dust of Life is a collection of vivid and devastating oral histories of Vietnamese Amerasians Abandoned during the war by their American fathers, discriminated against by the victorious Communists, and ignored for many years by the American government, they endured life in impoverished Vietnam Their stories are sad, sometimes tragic, but they are also testimonials to the strength of human resiliency.Robert S McKelvey is a former marine who served in Vietnam in the late 1960s Now a child psychiatrist, he returned to Vietnam in 1990 to begin the long series of interviews that resulted in this book While allowing his subjects to speak for themselves, McKelvey has organized their narratives around themes common to their lives early maternal loss, the experience of prejudice and discrimination, coping with adversity, dealing with shattered hopes for the future, and, for some, adapting to the alien environment of the United States.While unique in many respects, the Vietnamese Amerasian story also illustrates themes that are tragically universal neglect of the human by products of war, the destructiveness of prejudice and racism, the pain of abandonment, and the horrors of life amidst extreme poverty, hostility, and neglect.

    One thought on “Dust of Life”

    1. I would say this book is interesting even for a Vietnamese who did see or talk at least once in their life with such an Amerasan. There are not many works like this in general, and I rate 4* for the consequence of the book, probably leads to a lot more in-depth works in the same topic.At some point the book is so touched, somehow is bitter and elicit lots of thinking in me.

    2. An incredibly heart wrenching and generous book dedicated to the lesser known stories of the children America left behind.

    3. I think the book does what it wanted to do, engender sympathy for Vietnamese Amerasians. However as a book on the topic of Vietnamese Amerasians in general, an introduction, overview, analysis etc. I think it fails. I would regard it more as a supplemental book on the topic.Sure, what you read in it, is interesting for the most part, however it does have pretty strong anecdotal element. The general information on Amerasians is very short (btw. I wish that one woman who told me Vietnamese knew no [...]

    4. An academic work. Lots of cases. Interesting. No secret to success. Very difficult lives. Raises lots of questions. Good reference book.

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