Colère En Louisiane

Col re En Louisiane Set on a Louisiana sugarcane plantation in the s A Gathering of Old Men is a powerful depiction of racial tensions arising over the death of a Cajun farmer at the hands of a black man Poignant p

  • Title: Colère En Louisiane
  • Author: Ernest J. Gaines Michelle Herpe-Voslinsky
  • ISBN: 9782867463815
  • Page: 279
  • Format: None
  • Set on a Louisiana sugarcane plantation in the 1970s, A Gathering of Old Men is a powerful depiction of racial tensions arising over the death of a Cajun farmer at the hands of a black man Poignant, powerful, earthya novel of Southern racial confrontation in which a group of elderly black men band together against whites who seek vengeance for the murder of one of theSet on a Louisiana sugarcane plantation in the 1970s, A Gathering of Old Men is a powerful depiction of racial tensions arising over the death of a Cajun farmer at the hands of a black man Poignant, powerful, earthya novel of Southern racial confrontation in which a group of elderly black men band together against whites who seek vengeance for the murder of one of their own Booklist A fine novelere is a denouement that will shock and move readers as much as it does the characters Philadelphia Inquirer

    One thought on “Colère En Louisiane”

    1. A Gathering of Old Men: The Way It Used to BeI selected A Gathering of Old Men by Ernest J. Gaines as the Moderator's Choice for September, 2017, for On the Southern Literary Trail. This is the fourth book by Professor Gaines to be read by "The Trail."Come join us.All but one of Ernest J. Gaines' works are set in and around Bayonne, Louisiana. Perhaps a bit strange for a man who has spent more than half his life in California. But it is something that comes as no surprise considering Gaines' chi [...]

    2. "But they comes a day, Sheriff, they comes a day when a man got to stand".And that's what this book is about.

    3. Wow, here's a simply written book that packs one walloping punch. Written in 1983 by Ernest J Gaines, this book which won high acclaim as the best novel about racial tension in that decade, still rings all too true today.Read ( slightly ahead) for On The Southern Literary Trail-Sept. 5 stars

    4. Books like this make me wish I believed in reincarnation so that could come back as a teacher and share this book with young impressionable minds. It is an amazing book, especially so because of the deft, multifaceted approach it takes in attacking the subject of racism. It tackles it directly. This is does by relating stories which, while fictional within these pages, were duplicated countless times over in real life. It tells of black men who volunteered to fight in World War I, who served wit [...]

    5. Written in a simple and straightforward fashion, this book is anything but simple in its message and impact. The choice of having a different narrator for each chapter would not work well in just anyone’s hands, but Gaines is not just anyone, and he makes this device serve to reveal the truth of the situation without any bias or personal slant.How could anyone read this without feeling a great deal of pride for the subject old men? Each of them reaches into his deepest self and emerges as his [...]

    6. I’m going to start off by stating that A Gathering Of Old Men is the best book that I have read so far in 2013. Though it is a short novel, barely 200 pages, it packs a powerful punch as it portrays the need of a few elderly black men to finally stand up to the injustices that they felt living with Jim Crow. The raw emotion and dignity that is felt as one by one they tell their stories about the horror of being black in the deep south during the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s is gut-wrenching. Ther [...]

    7. Wow! What a powerful story! I often think that a five-star rating is just too many stars to choose from, but after reading this novel, five stars is just not enough. It was hard to put the book down, but necessary at times just to take a deep breath before continueing to read (and breathe). This is the second novel by Gaines I read (this month, ever). After reading A Lesson Before Dying I thought my expectations for this book might just be too high. Yet I was in for another big surprise. I alrea [...]

    8. I like how Gaines's books highlight the connections between people who are supposed to be unconnected, according to Southern traditions: redneck sheriffs and poor black men, white patriarchs and white rabble, light-skinned and dark-skinned black men, white women and black men, and, of course, blacks and whites generally. I understand that this book could be summed up in Big Charlie/Mr. Biggs's declaration "I am a man" - that is, this book is about emasculated, old black men taking a stand in the [...]

    9. There comes a time in every man’s life when it’s time to stand and fight – though it might take him eighty-years. But once he decides, nothing is going to stand in his way. “I know I’m old, maybe even crazy, but I’m going anyhow.” And as kind attracts kind, courage comes in numbers. So if age were a headcount, the twenty or so gathering would number in the thousands. A Gathering of Old Men is truly a masterfully written, southern literary gem, rich in authenticity of voice, charact [...]

    10. I really enjoyed this story, which derives much of its power from its portrayal of racial tensions in the South a decade after the civil rights movement by exploring the topic from both sides, something I haven't noticed in similar books that I've read.The writing is strong. The characters are colorful and filled with life, and I was impressed by the dialogue, which is something that can make or break a book for me.I also didn't mind the multiple POV characters (each chapter is told by a differe [...]

    11. We read this book in an Advanced Reading class that I taught for the Spring session. This was the second or third time that I have used this book in a reading class, and with each read it reveals more to me and increases my appreciation of Ernest Gaines' writing.Gaines' device of using different narrators for each chapter gives this book a layered perspective of the events that happen over one day on a Louisiana sugar cane plantation in the nineteen seventies. Gaines knows his subject, Southwest [...]

    12. Destined to be one of my top reads for 2012, this is a powerful tale of the deep south and the terrible bigotry that existed in the 1970's.When a son of the local, powerful white racist is killed, it takes a strong white woman to gather the old black men to rally.When each man arrives on the porch, gun in hand, they await the sheriff and the local near do wells who will seek revenge.When the sheriff demands to know who is to blame, each and every older gentleman claims he was the culprit.Each ch [...]

    13. Excellent! Powerful, thought-provoking book by a very talented writer. I am looking forward to reading his other works.

    14. Ernest J. Gaines's novel A Gathering of Old Men is set on a sugarcane plantation in Louisiana in the 1970s. There, one white woman and about 18 armed, old black men go nose-to-nose with the sheriff and his inept deputy over the death of a Cajun farmer. Each of the 18 men and say he did it, and so does the woman, but the sheriff believes he knows who is responsible. They engage in a day-long stand-off while Sheriff Mapes waits for the lynch mob he believes will come to vindicate the death of the [...]

    15. I have a love/hate reaction to this story. It is set in the late 70s in that far south part of Louisiana where sugar cane grows on the dry spots and Cajuns fish in all the bayous. There is a murder and tension builds between the whites and the blacks. The language is realistic and not politically correct. I think the same as one of the characters, "Won't it ever stop?" p. 122 I am pulling for the South to look its best. I tell myself this book would have made sense if it were set in the 40s but [...]

    16. A Gathering of Old Men by Ernest Gaines is an excellent book. It takes place in Louisiana. A Cajun man is shot and killed in the front yard of a black person's home. The white sheriff needs to determine who killed the guy but all the Old Men in the area gather around, and each claims to have done it. There is also a feisty, young, white woman who claims she did it. The sheriff believes he knows who did it but must sift through all the stories before he can act.Gradually the reader learns more ab [...]

    17. I decided against an afternoon at a fantastic art museum in favor of finishing this book! Yes, it was that compelling. In fact, as I got closer and closer to the end, I had to set it down time after time, as I couldn't handle the suspense--but then I had to pick it up again in 30 sec or so, because I just HAD to know what happened. How did I not know about this author until now?? This book was published in 1983, at a time when I didn't read fiction for almost 2 decades. I will now read anything [...]

    18. Scar on the Face of America I would like to see these statues, both Union and Confederate, taken down and their molten bronzes poured on the earth to spread as a scar. A reminder of the stain which the CW was, and still is. Perhaps a plaque, " In remembrance of the suffering before, during, and after the Civil War. This would be symbolic of the blood lost. Not only on the battlefield but the whipping post and the birth bed of a newly born mulatto.I'm not ready to buy into this "court historian" [...]

    19. Ernest J. Gaines uses the device of multiple narrators most famously used by William Faulkner in As I Lay Dying to tell a story largely through the points of view of a segment of the southern population that Faulkner depicted only from the distant vantage point of the old white aristocracy—impoverished African Americans sharecropping white landowners’ plantations, in this case the Louisiana bayou country in the 1970’s. The setting is further south than Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha County and [...]

    20. I used to love teaching Ernest Gaines' short stories with freshmen and seniors years ago.This book popped out at me at the library. Cover art is remarkable. The novel's key characters on the cover. Beautiful.The use of multiple narrators gives the story its fierce solidity.Set in sugarcane Louisiana in the 1970s, years of simmering tensions between black and white, man and woman, man and man, over the murder of a horrific Cajun white man (Beau Boutan), supposedly committed by Mathu, black father [...]

    21. Ernest Gaines is among the most talent American authors living today. Calling upon his childhood growing up in the Louisiana sugar cane fields, Gaines takes us into the world of rural blacks in the deep south. In A Gathering of Old Men, Gaines presents a kaleidoscope of the 20th century black experience through the 1970s. It is powerful. It is raw. It is moving.For more insight into Gaines and his writing, look for an interview with him on YouTube during which he explains what he learned from wr [...]

    22. I loved this book! It’s like "The Magnificent Seven" transformed into The Geriatric Eighteen. It is both comedic and tragic, and I believe it deserves its status as a classic of recent American literature.This is one of those books that made me so excited by reading it. It’s an ineffable feeling that hits you when you know you have come upon something really good. Rating: 4.5/5

    23. I loved the format. Almost like a slide show with quick shots of the situation from each character. This was also a good reminder that it is possible to read in color ( not just because of the race stuff)- Gaines uses colors as adjectives in a very precise and informative way that perfectly compliments the mood. This would have been more stars for me, but I have a zero-tolerance policy for anything with sports or sports stars- really unnecessary (imo) to this story. The end was also too abrupt.I [...]

    24. Ernest J. Gaines’s A Gathering of Old Men relates the story of a white Cajun murdered by a black man in the Louisiana bayou during the late 1970’s. The entire story is narrated through the first-person point of view of fifteen different characters, each with his own chapter, but some narrators sharing their viewpoint in more than one chapter. This first person point of view allows readers to develop some intimacy with each of these narrators, lending a sense of credibility to the story. I fi [...]

    25. (4.5 stars.) A very powerful book, making excellent use of the choral narration whereby each chapter is told by a different character. As a critic noted (in French paper l'Express), it's not just a great novel of the American South, it is one that does not indulge in nostalgia but rather looks at it as a place in transition.What gives added depth to the book is, half-way through the story, the inclusion of a white point-of-view with somewhat shifts our empathy (gained for the old African-America [...]

    26. A deep wonder goes into thought when you glance at the first few pages of the book and somehow the novel grabs you with its aura. The feeling in this book emerged when there seemed to be an uprising in people's hearts and minds. Being opposed, ridiculed, tortured and condescended, this was too much for the African community at Marshall and they finally made a justified decision to pay back in self-defense by having blood for blood. The theme for this book would probably be racism, however, defia [...]

    27. The Short of It:A short but powerful read.The Rest of It:Borrowed from : Set on a Louisiana sugarcane plantation in the 1970s, A Gathering of Old Men is a powerful depiction of racial tensions arising over the death of a Cajun farmer at the hands of a black man.If you’ve been watching the news lately, racial tension is at an all-time high. How fitting that our book club chose A Gathering of Old Men for this month’s meeting. Of course, we picked the book back in January so we had no idea how [...]

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