Le Roman De Leucippé Et Clitophon

Le Roman De Leucippe Et Clitophon Le roman de Leucipp et Clitophon d Achille Tatius d Alexandrie II si cle de notre re est le seul roman grec classique que son auteur n ait pas enferm dans le pass son intrigue est en effet cens e tr

  • Title: Le Roman De Leucippé Et Clitophon
  • Author: Achilles Tatius Jean-Philippe Garnaud
  • ISBN: 9782251004136
  • Page: 457
  • Format: Paperback
  • Le roman de Leucipp et Clitophon d Achille Tatius d Alexandrie II si cle de notre re , est le seul roman grec classique que son auteur n ait pas enferm dans le pass son intrigue est en effet cens e tre contemporaine du conteur, ce qui la rend extr mement vivante et plus proche du lecteur En crivant son histoire, Achille Tatius, bien qu utilisant les artifices traLe roman de Leucipp et Clitophon d Achille Tatius d Alexandrie II si cle de notre re , est le seul roman grec classique que son auteur n ait pas enferm dans le pass son intrigue est en effet cens e tre contemporaine du conteur, ce qui la rend extr mement vivante et plus proche du lecteur En crivant son histoire, Achille Tatius, bien qu utilisant les artifices traditionnels du roman d amour et d aventure, rend logiques ces pisodes fausses morts, rapts, etc dans la trame du roman, gr ce un art consomm du suspens et des annonces Loin d tre des pantins qui s agitent devant nous, ses personnages sont de v ritables tres humains qui vivent devant nos yeux avec leurs caract res contrast s et nuanc s chez lui, le coeur le meilleur est parfois travers de soup ons et l me la plus noire conna t quelque sentiment d humanit.

    One thought on “Le Roman De Leucippé Et Clitophon”

    1. To tell you the truth, it doesn't matter to me if one classifies this as a novel, or romance, or something else altogether. Those are, in any case, categories invented long after this text was written. Let's call it a novel, for convenience.Leucippe and Clitophon , written by the Alexandrian Greek Achilles Tatius in the 2nd century CE, is one of a canon of seven Greco-Roman novels which includes the remarkableSatyricon , reviewed here:/review/show/Unlike theSatyricon ,Leucippe and Clitophonhas c [...]

    2. L'amertume de l'amour, mais une vie chaste, voilà ce que l'histoire de Clitophon nous met en quelque sorte sous les yeux. Mais la vie si chaste de Leucippe ravit tout le monde en extase; on admire comment, battue, les cheveux coupés, outragée, et par-dessus tout, trois fois en danger de mort, elle tenait bon. Si tu veux aussi être vertueux, ami, ne t'arrache pas à l'aspect accessoire du tableau, mais retiens avant tout le dénouement de l'histoire: il unit ceux qui aiment avec chasteté. An [...]

    3. I am so glad to have finally gotten around to reading this book. It didn't quite make it up there with Longus' Daphnis and Chloe to be one of my favourite books of all time, but definitely one of the most entertaining pieces of classical literature I've read. It had absolutely everything that you want and expect from this genre: young love, sexual encounters, pirates, kidnapping, sacrifices, the list goe on. It was so entertaining and the ending so ridiculously (and improbably) happy. Parts of i [...]

    4. This wild ancient novel has almost everything- homosexuality, pirates, cannibalism, adultery, prostitutes, true love, magic, torture. The list is too long. However, despite all the cruelty, immoral acts (let me clarify, I mean attempted murder and rape), and the sorrow (Clinias's loss is heartbreaking), the author manages to convey a simple theme masked behind clever puns and thick clouds of sophist and platonic philosophy- that the desire, love, whatever the heck you want to call it, between tw [...]

    5. I wanted to read this because even as a Latin and Greek Major in College, it is one that I was not familiar with. I really agree with the description writeup. I enjoy reading and re-reading Greek and Roman Literature.

    6. A piece of Greco-Roman popular culture: The plot is inevitable, the characters are unnuanced, and the story is filled with unlikely coincidences and loose ends. But the novel is well-paced and it provides priceless glimpses of everyday life in the 2nd century. There is a marvelous description of Alexandria, which makes it sound like the Los Angeles of the eastern Mediterranean. There are also court scenes, pirates in the Nile Delta, shipwrecks on rocky shores, candid debates about sexual practic [...]

    7. Long underrated by Greek scholars, this work has recently been studied more, and rightfully so. A novel rich with intertext and allusion, while also parodying other novels of its genre. Highly recommend (and if you can read it in Greek, all the better!)

    8. This book is fantastically entertaining and informing on many levels. Woots and hoots for this second century romance novel. Clever in its own right, plain fun to read, yet rich with views then of myths and practices, religious and social, of the Mediterranean world. The Greek reader will gain a double measure. I will read again Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Clitophon and Leucippe. I was put on to the work of Achilles Tatius by the book of Kyle Harper, From Shame to Sin: The Christian Trans [...]

    9. This book I will say is for serious Classics nerds. I liked it, but parts of this are not for the faint of heart.

    10. So far it's a little repetitive: every chapter Cleitophon thinks that Leucippe's been murdered or sacrificed by pirates, or bandits and in the next chapter he discovers that she's been saved only to have it happen all over again.That being said, the scenarios Achilles Tatius dreams up are fantastical and silly, in a good way.On the other hand, his ecphrases are too frequent and are written telegram-style (how's that for proleptic?)Now that it's done, I have to say it was charming. Achilles Tatiu [...]

    11. "It was evening and the sun was setting, but there was not a hint of night, since a new sun was dawning, split into tiny specks. It was then that I saw a city vying with the heavens for beauty."I grabbed this one from the library after realizing I knew next to nothing about the ancient greek novel. It was a fun read. Lots of uninhibited and bizarre classical sexuality, weird literary techniques, digressions, narrow escapes. Did I mention the sex?

    12. 3.5/5Me gustó mucho más de lo que esperaba y me divertí mucho con las aventuras de esos dos. No obstante, la última parte (la de los juicios) me aburrió en demasía, cosa que hizo que le bajara un poco la nota al libro.Fuera de eso, me parece que es una lectura divertida, entretenida y, además, accesible para los que no están versados en el mundo clásico.

    13. In part seems like a string of slightly disjointed and amazingly unlikely stories tied together, but it is jolly good fun. The Homeric references (amongst others) make for good fun spotting. Whitmarsh's notes are very good.

    14. Loved this lovers' tale! Sex, beatings, guts-eatingsekphrasis. But the introduction was barf. (Informative, yet bursting with bombast.)

    15. Very very bizarre romance. If you like books where randoms appear and kidnap the female character because they're so hellbent on shagging them, this one's for you.

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