Exterminate Them: Written Accounts of the Murder, Rape, and Enslavement of Native Americans during the California Gold Rush

Exterminate Them Written Accounts of the Murder Rape and Enslavement of Native Americans during the California Gold Rush Popular media depict miners as a rough and tumble lot who diligently worked the placers along scenic rushing rivers while living in roaring mining camps in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains

  • Title: Exterminate Them: Written Accounts of the Murder, Rape, and Enslavement of Native Americans during the California Gold Rush
  • Author: Clifford E. Trafzer
  • ISBN: 9780870135019
  • Page: 138
  • Format: Paperback
  • Popular media depict miners as a rough and tumble lot who diligently worked the placers along scenic rushing rivers while living in roaring mining camps in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains Trafzer and Hyer destroy this mythic image by offering a collection of original newspaper articles that describe in detail the murder, rape, and enslavement perpetrated by tPopular media depict miners as a rough and tumble lot who diligently worked the placers along scenic rushing rivers while living in roaring mining camps in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains Trafzer and Hyer destroy this mythic image by offering a collection of original newspaper articles that describe in detail the murder, rape, and enslavement perpetrated by those who participated in the infamous gold rush It is a mercy to the Red Devils, wrote an editor of the Chico Courier, to exterminate them Newspaper accounts of the era depict both the barbarity and the nobility in human nature, but while some protested the inhumane treatment of Native Americans, they were not able to end the violence Native Americans fought back, resisting the invasion, but they could not stop the tide of white miners and settlers They became strangers in a stolen land.

    One thought on “Exterminate Them: Written Accounts of the Murder, Rape, and Enslavement of Native Americans during the California Gold Rush”

    1. Suggestion: don't read this book when you feel depressed! In the Preface at the beginning of the book, the editors clearly give the statistics about the indigenous inhabitants of California, whom started coming here in 10,000 B.C. The population by 1846 was c. 120,000. By 1900 -- a little over 50 years -- Native Americans in California numbered about 17,000. That pretty much hints as to what this book is about, along with title. It's a collection of actual newspaper article/notices regarding the [...]

    2. the authors touch upon the complexities and show how Indians and new (European) immigrants arrive or are born in a situation of enduring conflict, coming to see either red or white skin as evil, not understanding the history of their moment. Indian raiders on horseback? Not the original thing, more a mirror of European culture. Yet at times this more deserving story gives way to a new myth, that of the good and ultimately victorious Indian, seemingly unscathed.I really like the sort of study it [...]

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