Murder in the Forum

Murder in the Forum When Perennis Felix favorite of the Roman Emperor and would be enemy of all heralds his arrival in Glevum with the capricious execution of a slave there are few who dare to question his actions Ind

  • Title: Murder in the Forum
  • Author: Rosemary Rowe
  • ISBN: 9780747261032
  • Page: 223
  • Format: Paperback
  • When Perennis Felix, favorite of the Roman Emperor and would be enemy of all, heralds his arrival in Glevum with the capricious execution of a slave, there are few who dare to question his actions Indeed, a feast in his honor is universally approved in the cause of self preservation Libertus, freedman and pavement maker, and his patron, Marcus Septimus, are among the relWhen Perennis Felix, favorite of the Roman Emperor and would be enemy of all, heralds his arrival in Glevum with the capricious execution of a slave, there are few who dare to question his actions Indeed, a feast in his honor is universally approved in the cause of self preservation Libertus, freedman and pavement maker, and his patron, Marcus Septimus, are among the reluctant citizens at the celebration But the festivities come to a sudden halt when Felix appears to choke on a nut and dies in front of a stunned gathering And soon, the ever vigilant Libertus notices the mysterious disappearance of at least two guests Is it possible that behind Felix s seemingly accidental death there lies something infinitely sinister

    One thought on “Murder in the Forum”

    1. A interesting little romp, I'd not read any of these before although I enjoy the Falco books by Lindsay Davis. Slightly more gritty and set in a less cosy setting than Falco, they feel subtly more grounded in reality in terms of characters and attitudes than those and less domestic. Set in Britain in the 2nd century CE tits here is the slightly travel worn Libertus a former captured Celt sold into slavery and now eking out a living as a craftsman who also solves problems for his Patron. A worthw [...]

    2. I found the historical background fascinating; in fact much better than the rather slow and complicated plotting. Libertus is a likeable character, but not especially interesting or indeed believable.

    3. This may be the third book in the series, but it was the fourth (or was it fifth?) book that I read. So really, order isn't that big a deal, unless you're deeply, deeply interested in the relationships.By that I mean Libertus and his long lost wife, Marcus and his new wife (this was started in the previous book, A Pattern of Blood (link to review) ) and Junio and an unnamed slave girl (also started in the previous book). Personally, I don't think it's that important, since apart from Libertus, a [...]

    4. Murder in the Forum isn't great, nor is it terrible. Since it's the third book of a series, I might've been more interested if I'd read the other books, since I'd have known the characters and cared about them a bit more -- and I might've missed some subtleties of character-relationship. I don't think so, though. It was quite easy to get into without feeling that I was missing something, and it had a horrible tendency to overlabour a point -- like, "look! look at me! I'm a clever detective novel [...]

    5. As a freedman and pavement maker, Libertus enjoys the patronage of one of the most powerful men in Roman Britain, Marcus Septimus Aurelius, the regional governor’s personal representative. Often asked to investigate various crimes for Marcus, Libertus is again thrust into the center of intrigue when a powerful, yet unpopular, Roman official apparently chokes on a nut at a banquet given in his honor. Convinced that Felix was poisoned, Libertus must find the killer before Rome hears of it. As Fe [...]

    6. #3 in the Libertus pavement maker Roman Britain mystery series. Libertus is a freed Celtic slave whose patron is the Roman head of the settlement of Glevum (Gloucester) in 187 AD Roman Britain. A particularly unpleasant Roman citizen, favorite of the Roman emperor, visiting Britain stops in Glevum where he causes a lot of disruption and dies his first night there. Libertus is asked to investigate and discovers that whatever happened is more complicated than originally thought. A very good myster [...]

    7. The 3rd in the series, and as entertaining as the previous two. This time our intrepid lapidarian polisher of stone almost comes acropper, as he challenges one of the emperor Commodus' own. An imperial flunky is murdered, and his slave involved in disloyal shenanigans. A tangled web, but skillfully resolved, and with a new toga at the end of the puzzle. On a personal level, Libertus does sight his long, lost wife, and his patron, Marcus, takes a wife (a wealthy widow). Enjoyable read.

    8. I would personally prefer Roman mysteries set in Rome itself instead of Britain, but Rowe manages to make the story interesting by telling it from the perspective of a Celtic freedman. An enjoyable novel for a bit of light reading in your spare time.

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