Acastos

Acastos Acastos Two Platonic Dialogues is Murdoch s philosophical masterpiece featuring fictionalized discussions between the intellectual giants of the classical world including Socrates and Plato Described

  • Title: Acastos
  • Author: Iris Murdoch
  • ISBN: 9782851814722
  • Page: 469
  • Format: Paperback
  • Acastos Two Platonic Dialogues is Murdoch s philosophical masterpiece featuring fictionalized discussions between the intellectual giants of the classical world, including Socrates and Plato Described by Acastos, a friend of Plato s, the riveting debates center on the nature of goodness and faith, told through the voices of history s most celebrated thinkers.Witty and prAcastos Two Platonic Dialogues is Murdoch s philosophical masterpiece featuring fictionalized discussions between the intellectual giants of the classical world, including Socrates and Plato Described by Acastos, a friend of Plato s, the riveting debates center on the nature of goodness and faith, told through the voices of history s most celebrated thinkers.Witty and profound, these debates apply the timeless wisdom of history s renowned philosophers to the most contentious issues of the modern day.

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    1. [The heights of Mount Olympus. SOCRATES, PLATO, CALLISTOS, ACASTOS, IRIS MURDOCH. SOCRATES and MURDOCH are about sixty, the others about twentyCRATES: So what did you all think of Iris's little book?CALLISTOS: Oh, it was wonderful! Wonderful! Such passionate, fiery exchanges! So deep, so stirring, so intellectual! I admit a lot of it went over my head--SOCRATES: When the head is as pretty as yours, dear Callistos, we will find no fault with your observations. Acastos, what did you make of it?ACA [...]

    2. Art and ErosSOCRATES Isn’t it the nature of art to explore the relation between the public and the private? Art turns us inside out, it exhibits what is secret. What goes on inwardly in the soul is the essence of each man, it’s what makes us individual people. The relation between that inwardness and public conduct is morality. How can art ignore it?--Art and ErosIn times of madness, when leaders sound like deranged poodles yipping in the dark night, there is comfort in rational discourse. T [...]

    3. Is the Good good because the gods approve of it, or do they approve of it because it is good? (In effect, is the Good, is morality, somehow "above" the gods?) Or is morality just attributing high falutin' notions to one's own emotional preferences and prejudices, "dressing feelings up with flowers"?There are a few good reasons to read this book: (1) you have just finished reading Plato's Dialogues and desire a light, humorous palate cleanser. (2) you have read some of Iris Murdoch's fiction and [...]

    4. Murdoch's great turn in these short dialogues is to present Plato as a mostly introverted youth who keeps to himself, scribbling everything that everyone says, divorced from the others. He is alone, broody and petulant. Throughout the plays the characters again and again describe Plato as emotional, moody and irrational. They see him as a failing poet, and a none-too-bright philosopher. Late in each dialogue Plato erupts and can hold his peace no longer. In both manic episodes Plato frantically [...]

    5. Some very clever writing here. When I first saw the book I thought it was rather brave of someone to be writing dialogues in this day and age, especially inviting comparisons with Plato. If reading some of the old non-Platonic dialogues has taught me nothing else it's that the genre is much harder to do well than Plato makes it appear.But what we have here are two fully functioning dialogues that work on multiple levels. There are lots of clever in-jokes for those readers who have read Plato and [...]

    6. The boss-type intellectual and politician advocates social realistic art to improve society and, like Marx, doesn’t want to explain the world but change it. Surely, says Acastos, there are interesting good men in literature. Name some, says Socrates. That man is the measure of all things comes from Protagoras. The sophist in the second dialogue says the gods were just ideal pictures of us. I’d go further: they were projections of the gods inside us we’re ignorant of, our own unconscious wi [...]

    7. "A Dialogue About Art" and "A Dialogue about Religion." I usually find the dissection and analysis of ideas more tiring (and tiresome) than pleasurable, especially when they become abstractions divorced from any real-life correlatives. In this pair of conversations (which are actually two parts of a whole) though, Murdoch has contrived to make the interplay of ideas as interesting as the interplay of the characters she gives them to. She's such a lucid writer, with such a feel for the small char [...]

    8. What is the nature of reality? Is it orderly or mere chaos? Is religion merely mythology? These are some of the questions touched upon in this short philosophic excursion by Iris Murdoch. Two Platonic dialogues for our day, written to be performed on stage, the book is a fitting addition to philosophic corpus.Better known for her novels, Murdoch was an accomplished philosopher, and this along with Fire and the Sun demonstrate her philosophic prowess. The two dialogues are connected by the questi [...]

    9. Iris, Iris, Iris So you are smarter than I am. I struggled to make heads or tails of your dramatic conversations exploring art and religion. Socrates, Plato and some of their confreres, and I do mean confreres given their overt proclivities, carry on a 'stimulating' exploration. Now I have never read anything in the original Greek or Latin for that matter but their viewpoints seem remarkably modern and decidedly progressive. Can it be said that history only repeats itself as do the Greek dramas? [...]

    10. yes i actually enjoy dialogues with socrates at the center and his "boys" bantering around him and iris murdoch's effort at capturing such a scene -- first on art and then on religion -- was well worth my time. she was one smart woman thinker.

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