Psychiatric Power: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1973-1974

Psychiatric Power Lectures at the Coll ge de France In Psychiatric Power the fourth volume in the collection of his groundbreaking lectures at the Coll ge de France Michel Foucault addresses and expands upon the ideas in his seminal Madness and Civil

  • Title: Psychiatric Power: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1973-1974
  • Author: Michel Foucault Jacques Lagrange Arnold I. Davidson François Ewald Graham Burchell
  • ISBN: 9781403969224
  • Page: 368
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In Psychiatric Power, the fourth volume in the collection of his groundbreaking lectures at the Coll ge de France, Michel Foucault addresses and expands upon the ideas in his seminal Madness and Civilization, sketching the genealogy of psychiatry and of its characteristic form of power knowledge Madness and Civilization undertook the archeology of the division according tIn Psychiatric Power, the fourth volume in the collection of his groundbreaking lectures at the Coll ge de France, Michel Foucault addresses and expands upon the ideas in his seminal Madness and Civilization, sketching the genealogy of psychiatry and of its characteristic form of power knowledge Madness and Civilization undertook the archeology of the division according to which, in Western Society, the madman found himself separated from the sane That book ends with the medicalization of madness at the beginning of the nineteenth century Psychiatric Power continues this discourse up to the end of the nineteenth century, and the double depsychiatrization of madness, now dispersed between the neurologist and the psychoanalyst Presented in a conversational tone, Psychiatric Power brings fresh access and light to the work of one of the past century s preeminent thinkers.

    One thought on “Psychiatric Power: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1973-1974”

    1. There is a power to Focault's lectures which is not there (at least not as much) in his normal publications. Although at first "Psychiatric Power" might seem as a revisitation of "History Of Madness", it is far from. The actual idea of psychiatry is second to games of power and as such many of the ideas in these lectures are much closer to "discipline and punish".The main thesis is that first appearance of psychiatry was not as much a science of the mind and of curing the mentally ill, much rath [...]

    2. This course really sets the stage for Foucault's later works and ideas. We find the panopticon, power/knowledge, Truth, a medicine of sexuality, and the early formations of the dispositif.One of the topics in particular I found interesting is the relationships Foucault points out between the Family and psychiatry and the transition from sovereign power to disciplinary power.

    3. Great discussion of sovereign and disciplinary powers here. Also some good stuff on the historial discourses of truth. There are some gems you won't find in Madness and Civilization.

    4. But it's not like people abuse it, right? Man, I hope that psychologist who assisted the Army in torturing the detainees burns in fucking hell.

    5. Foucault was slow on spotting the internal aspects of human during his lecture in 1981-1984 (the whole sequence of Government of the Living, Hermeneutics of the Subjects, Government of Self and Others, The Courage of Truth). It turned out that he wasn't very sharp on this matter back in 1974 either, when he talked about psychiatry, which was a subject that specialized on taming the internal world. I don't know how others would respond to this. I found it to be ironic.Foucault treated this notion [...]

    6. A remarkably insightful and provocative course which should be more widely dispersed across those disciplines it involves so intimately. That said, it is without a doubt foundational to and anticipatory of the following:"In the 1990s, anthropologists and philosophers of science unravelled the intricate history of traumatic memory and post-traumatic stress syndrome In the process they have taught us that mental illness, like many other complex scientific facts, are invented and real at the same t [...]

    7. It is a best book of 1st half of 2013 year in my rating!It is very hard to read, as if you must try to go through jungle and you must cut the wreathed lianas with your machete to move further in one else step. But as you let yourself take the height of this great philosopher's mind you are almost swept over with the freshness and humanism of the book on such a hard topic. What is normality and HOW doctors of medicine turned into people who is powerable to label it? That is the point.

    8. This book expands of the practice of psychiatry as it is discussed in Birth of the Clinic, Madness and Civilization, and History of Madness. Like all of his lectures, the language is pretty accessible, sometimes in contrast to his aforementioned monographs. He draws some interesting conclusions about the relationship between sexuality and the patient/analyst dynamic that I haven't quite decided what to think of.

    9. I like Foucault's lectures better than his writings. This is the fourth of his lectures that I have read. I was waiting for it to come out in paper back. I think this work is better than Madness and Civilization. Foucault explains the role of psychiatry in the 18th century transition from sovereign power to disciplinary power of the 19th century.

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