Woolly Wolves and Woolless Sheep: Do Good Works Necessarily Provide Evidence of Salvation?

Woolly Wolves and Woolless Sheep Do Good Works Necessarily Provide Evidence of Salvation Woolly Wolves and Woolless Sheep defends the biblical doctrine of unconditional security popularly known as eternal security by refuting the popular notion that good works necessarily provide evidence

  • Title: Woolly Wolves and Woolless Sheep: Do Good Works Necessarily Provide Evidence of Salvation?
  • Author: Marty Cauley
  • ISBN: 9781456443153
  • Page: 207
  • Format: Paperback
  • Woolly Wolves and Woolless Sheep defends the biblical doctrine of unconditional security popularly known as eternal security by refuting the popular notion that good works necessarily provide evidence of salvation, much less necessary evidence of salvation Like the author s introductory book, Breaking the Rocking Horse, this subsequent release uses proveitists Woolly Wolves and Woolless Sheep defends the biblical doctrine of unconditional security popularly known as eternal security by refuting the popular notion that good works necessarily provide evidence of salvation, much less necessary evidence of salvation Like the author s introductory book, Breaking the Rocking Horse, this subsequent release uses proveitists as a coined term to describe the opposing theology of those who allege that the way professing believers live proves whether or not they are saved Like its predecessor, the purpose of this sequel is to disprove proveitism The follow up release does so by focusing on Jesus parable of the sheep and the goats With over 70 illustrations and advanced discussions in the appendixes regarding the logical necessity of believing in unconditional security, this book bridges the gap between an introductory and advanced consideration of this parable The thesis of this book as applied to that parable is that a person s performance does not prove if that individual is a sheep or a goat Within the fuller scope of Scripture, one discovers gray sheep and black sheep, as well as gray goats and white goats These findings are harmonized exegetically with Jesus parable during the course of the treatment Because proveitists think that the way they live proves that they are saved, they logically are susceptible to the charge of religious snobbery In their minds, they live better than the lost, so proveitists believe that this supposed superior performance validates that they are proven not to be lost by the way they live From their theological perception then, they necessarily must be better than the lost To be sure, some within their ranks try to offset this criticism of bigotry by saying that they are not perfect, just forgiven Yet the logical implications of their proveitistic claims require that they be understood as fully asserting that Christians are not perfect, just better than non Christians The book challenges such proveitistic prejudice Even worse, theologically, proveitists believe that their entrance into heaven is conditioned on the evidence they provide of being a sheep by the way they live Salvation from hell is not conditioned on being a sheep, but on proving that one is a sheep by means of one s morally superior performance When it comes to answering the question as to what one must do to be saved from hell, proveitists are performatists, basing their salvation on their performance The primary benefit of this book to the reader is to encourage a biblically accurate understanding of the parable of the sheep and goats so that the reader may not be deceived unwittingly into seeking salvation from eternal damnation by an unbiblical means Both salvation from hell and assurance of such salvation are to be found in Christ alone, not in a believer s performance.

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