Mad Dog

Mad Dog Johnny Mad Dog Adair earned his reputation as a paramilitary leader seeking freedom and peace in Northern Ireland The authorities hold him responsible for murders and he became known as the most fe

  • Title: Mad Dog
  • Author: Johnny Adair
  • ISBN: 9781844543397
  • Page: 161
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Johnny Mad Dog Adair earned his reputation as a paramilitary leader seeking freedom and peace in Northern Ireland The authorities hold him responsible for 41 murders and he became known as the most feared and infamous terrorist of them all Now, he breaks his silence to tell his true story about fighting for what he truly believes in peace in Northern Ireland, a lifelonJohnny Mad Dog Adair earned his reputation as a paramilitary leader seeking freedom and peace in Northern Ireland The authorities hold him responsible for 41 murders and he became known as the most feared and infamous terrorist of them all Now, he breaks his silence to tell his true story about fighting for what he truly believes in peace in Northern Ireland, a lifelong struggle in which he became known as the toughest man in the UK.

    One thought on “Mad Dog”

    1. Well what can I say about this book, it was certaintly an interesting read and gave a clear insight into the mind of one of Northern Ireland's top Loyalist paramilitaries. It is obviously quite one sided and glaringly hypocritical in parts but it is fairly well written and doesn't appear to have been 'tweaked' by the publishers. Was surprised that it didn't overly glorify Adair's role in the UDA and C Company but unsurprisingly Adair doesn't come across as remorseful other than the amount of tim [...]

    2. An excellent insight into life in the paramilitary's during 'The Trouble's' in Northern Ireland, told from a Loyalist's viewpoint. Johnny 'Mad Dog' Adair tells of his early years growing up in Belfast and joining the paramilitary's before rising to infamy as the leader of the UFF's C Company, and his war with the IRA, the Good Friday Agreement[Adair is now committed to the peace process], and the subsequent implosion of the various Loyalist groups, which forced Adair to flee Belfast and settle i [...]

    3. Interesting that Adair portrays himself as a victim and almost as a moderate and supporter and fervent supporter of the peace process. But the ghost writer's prose is too wooden

    4. Johnny Adair was a paramilitary godfather in Belfast during the troubles. Of course Adair tries to make himself look much better than he is. There was so much evil in our wee country at that time it is scary to look back at. The evil still continues today but it is tarted up to look more respectable and is now called politics.

    5. Superficially honest but reads like an attempt to, not quite whitewash, but at least rationalise the reputation of someone who by all accounts is not easy to defend.

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