Inside Transracial Adoption

Inside Transracial Adoption A resource guide for families considering transracial adoption This book is the result of two families experiences adoption multicultural children Somewhat limited in scope and attitude The section on

  • Title: Inside Transracial Adoption
  • Author: Gail Steinberg
  • ISBN: 9780944934241
  • Page: 379
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A resource guide for families considering transracial adoption This book is the result of two families experiences adoption multicultural children Somewhat limited in scope and attitude The section on Black hair care is well done Authors Gail Steinberg and Beth Hall Ages Adult Hardcover Publisher Perspectives Press, 2000 405 pp A resource guide for families coA resource guide for families considering transracial adoption This book is the result of two families experiences adoption multicultural children Somewhat limited in scope and attitude The section on Black hair care is well done Authors Gail Steinberg and Beth Hall Ages Adult Hardcover Publisher Perspectives Press, 2000 405 pp A resource guide for families considering transracial adoption This book is the result of two families experiences adoption multicultural children Somewhat limited in scope and attitude We recommend this as one of several articles publications on transracial adioption The section on Black hair care is well done Does not talk about how to address the children s cultural needs or the issues relevant to living in urban communities.

    One thought on “Inside Transracial Adoption”

    1. There was some good information in this book but it's full of typos making it hard to read, & some of the advice & opinions I disagreed with. I thought the idea that all whites are automatically racists because they benefit from racism was ridiculous, & I thought the authors (who are both white & seem to think they're experts on how blacks, Hispanics, & Asians think) put way too much importance on race. They say basically that all members of a race think the same, which is ob [...]

    2. Gail Steinberg and Beth Hall, Inside Transracial Adoption (Perspectives Press, 2000)The more books I encounter from Perspectives Press (and as my wife and I are in the process of adopting a child, I've been seeing a lot of them over the past six months or so), the more I wonder if it's not a vertical-market vanity press. Inside Transracial Adoption is just the latest link in the chain. The editing and proofreading, if any were done, were shoddy, making the book even tougher to read than its subj [...]

    3. This book is the major heavyweight title in transracial adoption. The authors themselves have adopted transracially, and include interviews with families (parents and kids) in all the various ages and stages. I think the single most helpful thing in this book is actually a comparison section, where the authors separate "issues all adoptive kids face" from "issues transracially adopted kids face." I found it SUPER helpful, because I realized that a lot of my fears, worries and other "dark scenari [...]

    4. The list of "Things to Keep in Mind as an Adoptive Parent" is long to begin with; "transracial" matters lengthen the list a bit more. We learn so much from those who have gone before us during our adoption adventure, and that's the case with this book. Hall and Steinberg are candid about what they've learned, where they've failed, and what other families can do to avoid their mistakes (and they've done a lot right too!).

    5. I confess, I didn't get very far in this book I got stuck in the second section on "Racial Identity". On the good side, this book did help me to understand racism better. The idea that because I'm white I am given advantages and considerations without asking for them was a eye opener to me. The concept that children of color we would adopt wouldn't be granted such consideration when they are not with my husband and I was helpful to understand. In addition, there are extensive annotated bibliogra [...]

    6. Seriously, did this book even have an editor? Garbled sentences, random font changes, typos and spelling errors seriously detracted from the authors' thesis, however valid it may be. Their primary point is that race matters (kind of preaching to the choir- if adoptive parents didn't already believe it, they wouldn't read the book in the first place) and that while race is not everything, it is a factor in everything. Unfortunately, this meant that instead of a well structured, logically organize [...]

    7. There is a lot of information packed into this book. I found it difficult to read straight through, so I just read it in shorter sections over a long period of time. Definitely worth reading for anyone considering adopting a child of a different race. I didn't agree with every single conclusion, but it brought up a lot of relevant issues that should be considered. It helps that both authors have been through the process themselves. Reading this book can give a parent some preparation for what th [...]

    8. Super disorganized. And yet, I learned a lot from the authors' experiences. Some of the child development stuff I valued and other theory I ignored. Like all advice, you take what makes sense to you and you leave the rest. I appreciated some of their advice about how to approach conversations with family. Sort of a mixed bag of a book, but in a world where there are so few sources on transracial adoption, I appreciated just hearing people's stories and experiences. And I appreciate that they reg [...]

    9. I found this to be a book with some excellent points and some dated, irritating perspectives. It is also quite repetitive at times, and the authors sometimes come off as more than a little pleased with themselves. Inside Transracial Adoption is one to be read with an open and critical mind. I certainly wouldn't take it as a primary text for learning about transracial adoption. This is one of those books that I used to give myself time to think about issues of transracial adoption rather than one [...]

    10. Written by two transracial adoptive mothers for transracial adoptive parents. Like any book, particularly books about parenting and families, I don't agree with all of the author's suggestions and perspectives. The strategies and suggestions are mostly based on the authors' experiences, not research, but still good thought-provoking ideas. Overall, this is one of the better books I have read on transracial adoption, and because it is often referred to in other adoption literature and by some ado [...]

    11. I disagreed with the authors' conclusions and point of view most of the time. It was interesting and made me think but I think the perspective in "I"m Chocolate, You're Vanilla" is more accurate and helpful.

    12. A must-read for anyone considering transracial adoption -- chock full of stories and questions that will help you think through the issues surrounding this decision.

    13. Good informationy some is applicable at this point in our journey, I think this will be a book I revisit as issues arise. I can see it becoming extremely helpful as she gets older.

    14. great book, challenging in many ways, just have to remember that ultimately Jesus is putting this child in your family and is sufficient despite your failings

    15. 2.5 Stars. It was lengthy and disorganized, still I found their personal experiences to be beneficial. I'm glad they included excerpts from "experts" (most of whom were adoptees).

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *