Alfred Kubin: The Leopold Collection

Alfred Kubin The Leopold Collection Alfred Kubin is one of the most accomplished draughtsmen of visions of the th century Born in at Leitmeritz in Bohemia Kubin spent his youth and years of study at the School of Applied Arts in

  • Title: Alfred Kubin: The Leopold Collection
  • Author: Alfred Kubin
  • ISBN: 9783775712620
  • Page: 236
  • Format: Paperback
  • Alfred Kubin is one of the most accomplished draughtsmen of visions of the 20th century Born in 1877 at Leitmeritz in Bohemia, Kubin spent his youth and years of study at the School of Applied Arts in Salzburg He later studied art and took drawing lessons in Munich Inspired by his fascination with the philosophies of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, and influenced artisticalAlfred Kubin is one of the most accomplished draughtsmen of visions of the 20th century Born in 1877 at Leitmeritz in Bohemia, Kubin spent his youth and years of study at the School of Applied Arts in Salzburg He later studied art and took drawing lessons in Munich Inspired by his fascination with the philosophies of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, and influenced artistically by Goya, Klinger, Ensor, Redon, Rops and Munch, Kubin first found his own idiosyncratic Kubinesque set of motifs, rooted in dream visions, at the turn of the last century He called his imagery a vital escape into the unreal ghostly figures, hybrid creatures, variants of torture and self torture, dream, vampirism, spiritualism, decadence, sex, death and birth His extraordinary oeuvre comprises than 20,000 drawings, a large part of it pen drawings and portfolio pieces as well as illustrations for than 70 books, all of them testifying to his gloomy world view This book features a representative selection of master sheets by the bizarre multi talented artist.

    One thought on “Alfred Kubin: The Leopold Collection”

    1. The introduction, biography, and reflective essay that preface the sketches and paintings are rather aggrandizing, elevating Kubin's genius artificially and attempting to mythologize his work. It's a strange move because he doesn't seem to need any such artifice: For one thing, when he was in a good mood, he aggrandized and mythologized himself plenty--the guy had an ego as outrageous as his neurotic pessimism, and he was prone to lavish, fictionalized embellishments of his own biography. But mo [...]

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