The Invention of Women: Making an African Sense of Western Gender Discourses

The Invention of Women Making an African Sense of Western Gender Discourses The woman question this book asserts is a Western one and not a proper lens for viewing African society A work that rethinks gender as a Western contruction The Invention of Women offers a new way

  • Title: The Invention of Women: Making an African Sense of Western Gender Discourses
  • Author: Oyèrónkẹ́ Oyěwùmí
  • ISBN: 9780816624416
  • Page: 235
  • Format: Paperback
  • The woman question, this book asserts, is a Western one, and not a proper lens for viewing African society A work that rethinks gender as a Western contruction, The Invention of Women offers a new way of understanding both Yoruban and Western cultures Oyewumi traces the misapplication of Western, body oriented concepts of gender through the history of gender discoursesThe woman question, this book asserts, is a Western one, and not a proper lens for viewing African society A work that rethinks gender as a Western contruction, The Invention of Women offers a new way of understanding both Yoruban and Western cultures Oyewumi traces the misapplication of Western, body oriented concepts of gender through the history of gender discourses in Yoruba studies Her analysis shows the paradoxical nature of two fundamental assumptions of feminist theory that gender is socially constructed in old Yoruba society, and that social organization was determined by relative age.

    One thought on “The Invention of Women: Making an African Sense of Western Gender Discourses”

    1. A very thought-provoking book about the ways in which Western gender categories have been imposed on African contexts. She shows that in Nigeria, society was not stratified along the lines of a binary understanding of gender, but more along the lines of elder/youth.

    2. The central thesis of the book concerning gender (or lack thereof) in Yoruba society is well-argued but its post-structuralist trappings (especially in the first chapter) are iffy

    3. So this is more a 3.5 star book because a lot of it is critiques that you can find in a lot of publications at this point (although this is a very early articulation of them), i.e. "woman" as constructed in western discourse and "sex" as a corollary are socially defined terms that contain inherent metaphysical properties. However, this is also a really awesome book on investigating that claim by comparing how male/female were imposed colonially in and how pre-contact systems of sociability and e [...]

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