Providence in Early Modern England

Providence in Early Modern England This book is the most extensive study to date of the sixteenth and seventeenth century belief that God actively intervened in human affairs to punish reward and chastise Providentialism has often be

  • Title: Providence in Early Modern England
  • Author: Alexandra Walsham
  • ISBN: 9780198206552
  • Page: 236
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This book is the most extensive study to date of the sixteenth and seventeenth century belief that God actively intervened in human affairs to punish, reward, and chastise Providentialism has often been seen as a distinctive hallmark of puritan piety However, Dr Walsham argues that it was a cluster of assumptions that penetrated every sector of English society, cuttingThis book is the most extensive study to date of the sixteenth and seventeenth century belief that God actively intervened in human affairs to punish, reward, and chastise Providentialism has often been seen as a distinctive hallmark of puritan piety However, Dr Walsham argues that it was a cluster of assumptions that penetrated every sector of English society, cutting across the boundaries created by status, creed, education, and wealth.

    One thought on “Providence in Early Modern England”

    1. Impressively researched and compelling argument that English Protestants --and not just the extreme Puritan ones -- interpreted their world as if God shaped it on a day-to-day basis. Yet another reason to dismiss the assertion that the Protestant Reformation paved the way to a mechanistic account of the universe. And, also (wait for it, wait for it) Walsham's book is well written and pretty funny at times.

    2. 'Providence' is the idea that God has direct intervention in the care and guidance of the Earth and in human affairs. Most commonly this was conceived as the hand of God reaching down to punish or reward evildoers or the 'Godly' and indeed the notion that Early Modern people passionately believed in such a phenomena has seriously shaped popular culture's impression of them. We all can imagine the rather condescending images of historical people on TV, shrieking about witches at bad harvests, poi [...]

    3. A historical look at Providence. Especially relevant in light of postmodern skepticism that is currently making inroads into Christian epistemology. This was a great read, especially in light of the current epistemological nihilism that exists in culture today.

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