Before We Say Goodbye. Gabriella Ambrosio

Before We Say Goodbye Gabriella Ambrosio Jerusalem Where one young Palestinian is about to make the greatest sacrifice of allIn the style of the acclaimed TV drama each chapter covers an hour in the day leading up to the suicide bo

  • Title: Before We Say Goodbye. Gabriella Ambrosio
  • Author: Gabriella Ambrosio
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 360
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Jerusalem, 2002 Where one young Palestinian is about to make the greatest sacrifice of allIn the style of the acclaimed TV drama 24, each chapter covers an hour in the day leading up to the suicide bombing Written in filmic, dramatic language, this is both pacy and thought provoking and will appeal to young adults and adults alike It is endorsed by Amnesty InternatioJerusalem, 2002 Where one young Palestinian is about to make the greatest sacrifice of allIn the style of the acclaimed TV drama 24, each chapter covers an hour in the day leading up to the suicide bombing Written in filmic, dramatic language, this is both pacy and thought provoking and will appeal to young adults and adults alike It is endorsed by Amnesty International UK as contributing to a better understanding of human rights and the values that underpin them.

    One thought on “Before We Say Goodbye. Gabriella Ambrosio”

    1. Before I Say Goodbye is the story Jerusalem one rainy morning and those who woke up, each ready to go about their daily routines as they do every morning….Myriam is an 18 year old Isreali Jew who is still in shock after losing her best friend, Michael, to a suicide bomber only two months ago. She is trying to make sense of the world she lives in and on this day she makes a decision – to choose life.Dima is an 18 year old Palestinian girl who is top of her class and about to get married. She [...]

    2. nicely told short story, taking no sides.each chapter tells of an hour in a day from various characters, including 18-year-old Israeli Jewish girl. Myriam, who is numb with grief over the loss of a friend, and Dima, 18-year-old Palestinian suicide bomberought provoking to say the least.

    3. I have just finished reviewing this novel for a UK book retailer.It is so easy for a book like this to take sides and only give account of events from their own viewpoint to make political gains. However, this is not the case in this novel, which is well rounded and very poignant.It is apparent from reading this novel that the characters are very well researched and this is explored really well in this book. I really did find this very poignant and felt only empathy for Dima as she goes about he [...]

    4. One day, two cultures, many lives.Before We Say Goodbye is the story of a single day in Jerusalem in 2002. Although it primarily follows two different 18-year-old girls, one Palestinian the other Israeli, there is a very large cast of characters. If anything, there are so many characters making the interweaving plots difficult to follow. The direction of the plot becomes obvious quite early on. The two girls, Dima and Myriam each find themselves facing a day of change. Myrian is trying to come t [...]

    5. Starting at 7am, 29th March 2002, Before We Say Goodbye tells the story hour by hour, until, seven hours later, everything is changedI’m honestly not sure where to start this review. Before I Say Goodbye was absolutely amazing – but it was more than that. It really made me think, made me feel, and made me understand everything that has been going on between the Israeli and the Palestinians. I felt close to tears as I got nearer the end: it all seemed so real.And, you see, that’s the thing: [...]

    6. As a young adult’s book I read this with the question of how I would have responded to it when I was a teenager. For some reason the only place I ever wanted to travel when I was a child was Israel. I joined a penfriend club and distributed contacts for my school friends as I began my friendship with a girl my own age on the other side of the world. She told me about compulsory military service in that tone of ‘its’ just part of our lives’, but also of her concerns for everyone in the re [...]

    7. Before We Say Goodbye is written as a third person narrative switching between quite a few people in the lead up to a terrorist suicide bombing. Dima, a Palestinian girl of eighteen who is thinking of her future – marriage to her cousin Faris, further studies, quite a lot of freedom. Myriam, a Jewish girl of the same age has yet to recover from the loss of her best friend Michael, who himself was the victim of a bombing recently. They had plans to return to America, where they had both lived a [...]

    8. Beautifully written, very short novel. (I think it takes about 2 hours to read it all). I read this in bursts - nearly half of it in one go while waiting at an airport, then, months later, another chunk.Why the months of reading other things? Because, as beautifully written and effective as this novel is, it is not an easy read. The book has a dreamy atmosphere - even though it is extremely well grounded, too. A strange thing to say: a book that feels like a (bad) dream, and almost journalism, a [...]

    9. A very short and quite nice novel really, for me it did take a while to quite understand what was going on but this novel was very powerful and wonderful in the way the story knitted together. In this book, each and every person involved has their own story in which within a short time all come together to be part of something quite monumental in the town of Jerusalem, Knowing the background about the Palestinians and Israel could be quite useful in this case as it made the book more easier to u [...]

    10. Before We Say Goodbye is a short book, but the writing is achingly bittersweet. It fictionalises the events of 29 March 2002, starting at 7am, and ending shortly after 2pm when Dima, an 18-year-old Palestinian suicide bomber, detonates her bomb, killing not only herself but a security guard and an 18-year-old Israeli Jewish girl. Myriam, the Jewish girl, looked so similar to Dima (they both had "lost eyes") that they were mistaken for sisters.I read this book in one sitting, but it will stay wit [...]

    11. Although I enjoyed this book I’m not sure if I truly appreciate it. I don’t know what Drama 24 is so I didn’t pick up on this reference and I did feel there may a little too many view points involved. There were points were I forgot which side that character was on and a few of the characters I found struggled to add anything to the story. Despite this however the book was still good. It taught me a bit about something I really don’t know anything about and the concept was really interes [...]

    12. This book was probably good. This book was probably full of amazing descriptions and details. I'm not doubting that it doesn't.The problem is, I missed them. Why? Because I couldn't keep track of all the characters. There were so many and I couldn't remember the differences between them and I couldn't remember all of their names. I had to keep flicking back to the front to find out who they were and what relevance they had to the plot. Because I was flicking to see who's who every new chapter, I [...]

    13. Maybe I just didn't get it, but I just didn't get it.Way too many characters to keep track of, more than once in the book I thought I was reading someone who had died in a previous chapter. No characters are given any real time to develop and any chance they have it switches to another character's POV. I have no idea the message/meaning of the book at all, nothing is clear. And on top of that a lot of the writing seems jumbled and reads wrong. Example (quoted exactly) from page 121:"The girl the [...]

    14. This book offers a rare and heart wrenching insight into the personal tragedy shared by both the Israeli and Palestinian people caught up in one of the most long-standing conflicts of our time. Ambrosio maintains an objective political perspective throughout, offering us an honest portrayal of the universal cost of war, both individually and collectively. She beautifully develops the histories of each individual character, intwining their lives and ultimately their fate-demonstrating that in fac [...]

    15. This is a beautifully written book, but so, so sad. With only a 145 pages it is a short book with concise language and I couldn't put it down. It begins at 7 am on a rainy day in Jerusalem where a group of ordinary Israelis and Palestinians are getting ready to start the day, for some their last day on earth, and ends at 2 pm when a suicide bomb explodes. The reader follows the different characters, each with their fears and troubles, each about to have their lives irrevocably changed for ever. [...]

    16. A rather horrific fragmented story about two opposing sides in Israel who have become so hurt by the violence experienced and perpetrated that they almost turn to stone, considering actions that will guarantee suffering and death. I read it quickly and was engaged throughout but it's not a book that leaves you with a fuzzy feeling. Amnesty International has endorsed it. Worth the effort.

    17. A 3rd person story told about two girls; one Israeli and one Palestine. It was short and managed to convey the story without laying blame for the conflict on either side. It's sad and confronting while giving an intimate look at a world we only see on news headlines.

    18. A young adult's book that offers a non-judgemental view on the Israeli-Palestinian problem. Thought - provoking.

    19. Speaking about the Palestinian conflict without taking sides, as the writer said, but I don't believe there are two sides to consider in the first place for a person to say they are mutual.

    20. Very poignant examination of prejudice and tribalism. Large cast of characters whose lives intersect. Climax somewhat predictable but well worth the read, it's only short!

    21. This book was a short, sharp read - almost too brief to really identify with the characters. But it still had some beautifully written prose, and it tackled a divisive topic without judgement.

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