Walker Evans: Masters of Photography Series

Walker Evans Masters of Photography Series Walker Evans than any other photographer in the thirties and forties defined the documentary aesthetic For over four decades he used his camera precisely and lucidly to record the American experienc

  • Title: Walker Evans: Masters of Photography Series
  • Author: Aperture Walker Evans
  • ISBN: 9780893817411
  • Page: 450
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Walker Evans, than any other photographer in the thirties and forties, defined the documentary aesthetic For over four decades he used his camera precisely and lucidly to record the American experience He is generally acknowledged as America s finest documentary photographer of this century He attempted to show both the beauty of his subjects and the horror of theWalker Evans, than any other photographer in the thirties and forties, defined the documentary aesthetic For over four decades he used his camera precisely and lucidly to record the American experience He is generally acknowledged as America s finest documentary photographer of this century He attempted to show both the beauty of his subjects and the horror of the social conditions in which they lived During the Depression, from 1935 to 1937, Evans took part in the most extensive photographic project ever carried out in the United States the pictorial survey of the Farm Security Administration The now legendary collaboration with James Agee that resulted in the masterpiece Let Us Now Praise Famous Men documents his dedication to photographing the country he knew Evans s talented eye and sensitive heart make him one of the great photographers of this century This volume contains many of his best known images.

    One thought on “Walker Evans: Masters of Photography Series”

    1. Would have given 5 stars if they had shown some of the Boston photos or the subway riders they talked about in the bio. Still, this was a very nice find in Goodwill for $1.99!

    2. Not bad book of photographs by the great Walker Evans, mostly of the rural South during the 1930s--sharecroppers and barns and faded plantation houses mostly--but also of New York City and other places. Kind of strangely arranged.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *