Beckett Remembering/Remembering Beckett: A Centenary Celebration

Beckett Remembering Remembering Beckett A Centenary Celebration A collection of the notoriously private Beckett s reminiscences about his life and remembrances of Beckett fromthose who knew him

  • Title: Beckett Remembering/Remembering Beckett: A Centenary Celebration
  • Author: James Knowlson Elizabeth Knowlson
  • ISBN: 9781559708234
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Paperback
  • A collection of the notoriously private Beckett 39 s reminiscences about his life and remembrances of Beckett fromthose who knew him.

    One thought on “Beckett Remembering/Remembering Beckett: A Centenary Celebration”

    1. Read this book to begin on Beckett. It's far better than any biographies which get mired in detail, far more instructive than didactic texts on meaning and representation, far more personal than anything else I have seen on Beckett. This is not the academic surgery normally performed on his writing, but a ton of excerpts by people who knew him on Beckett the person, what drove him, how he managed, and indeed a biography of sorts. It's excellent.

    2. Finally done with this book! It's been an absolute pleasure translating :) Look for it in Turkish in January!!

    3. I have read James Knowlson's most excellent biography of Sam so I was unsure if this would simply be extracts from that great book. Great news its is not a regurgitation but an expansion and additions from different sources, further broadening our knowledge. There can never be too much material about this most unique of writers.

    4. Because the bulk of the book is comprised ofl interviews of Sam Beckett, his friends, family and colleagues, I found entry into an intimate, wonderful new world of Beckett's life and his brilliant work.

    5. For as much wonderful material as this book contained, it's too bad it wasn't arranged better. For those interested in Beckett, I'd recommend Knowlson's earlier 800-page brick, Damned to Fame, which is less sentimental, better organized, and more erudite.

    6. I just really loved some of the reminiscences in this book; though my initial feeling was that it was all tacky and just a collection of things that didn't fit anywhere else.

    7. This is a fine expansion of Knowlson's essential biography of Beckett, "Damned to Fame," with memories from people who knew Beckett at every stage of his life, from childhood to his last days in a nursing home. There are also excerpts from interviews with Beckett, which make up the most fascinating part of the book, although his voice is mostly absent from the second half, which is mostly devoted to people who worked with him in the theater or who staged his plays in the US, particularly members [...]

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