Black Watch

Black Watch Viewed through the eyes of those on the ground Black Watch reveals what it means to be part of the legendary Scottish regiment what it means to be part of the war on terror and what it means to mak

  • Title: Black Watch
  • Author: Gregory Burke
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 351
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Viewed through the eyes of those on the ground, Black Watch reveals what it means to be part of the legendary Scottish regiment, what it means to be part of the war on terror, and what it means to make the journey home.This book contains Gregory Burke s award winning script, with production notes by the director John Tiffany and colour photographs that capture the powerfulViewed through the eyes of those on the ground, Black Watch reveals what it means to be part of the legendary Scottish regiment, what it means to be part of the war on terror, and what it means to make the journey home.This book contains Gregory Burke s award winning script, with production notes by the director John Tiffany and colour photographs that capture the powerful and inventive use of movement in this urgent piece of theatre.The National Theatre of Scotland s production of Black Watch opened at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2006, where it won a Herald Angel, a Scotsman Fringe First, the Critics Circle Award and the South Bank Show Award for Theatre During a world tour it won the Laurence Olivier Award for Best New Play and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Foreign Play.Celebrated for its bravery and clannish loyalty the Black Watch has been in the vanguard of countless British military expeditions from Waterloo and the Somme to Kosovo Its last great challenge before enforced amalgamation was relieving American forces at Camp Dogwood in Iraq during 2004 BLACK WATCH is a timely and vital theatrical investigation based on interviews with former soldiers from this legendary Scottish regiment who served in Iraq.

    One thought on “Black Watch”

    1. The stage performance is excellent, fast and moving. Reading the play after the performance brought back many of the emotions from the play. Reading the play before the performance may not be as good, this is an active play, played at a fast pace on a traverse stage layout. The language is real, consequently some may find it offensive, others may recognise the authenticity which is what good theatre is all about.I originally come from the part of Scotland which served as the recruitment area of [...]

    2. I only give it four stars because so much of the beauty in this play is in the visual performance. one of the most AMAZING productions I have EVER seen.

    3. The honesty of this play is engaging and thought provoking. Being able to follow verbatim accounts of these Scottish soldiers’ stories gives the play an extra dimension not only on the page, but in production too. With a play such as ‘Black Watch’ it is the false sense of security at times that grips you. Stories of laughs and jokes brought literally crashing down due to bombs and air strikes. Great read.

    4. I've read this and also had the pleasure of seeing a production of it. The story has a lot more heart than it seems at first.

    5. Black Watch is about Scotland's famous Black Watch regiment's part in the Iraq War, or the "war on terror". While the script may be a little confusing with the constantly changing scenes and focusses, Burke does a wonderful job highlighting the media's role in the public's opinion of the war and contrasting it with the reality or the soldiers' thoughts. In a way, Burke is able to capture the futility of the Black Watch's mission. (My professor compared it to Beckett's Waiting for Godot; the char [...]

    6. Perhaps my favorite thing I've read in the latter half of 2013. so mad that i did not get to see this when it toured the country. the story of the famous Scottish army regiment subjected to grueling tours of duty in Iraq, Burke, and director John Tiffany, take what could have come out as a cliched anti-war screed and turned it into something more interesting: a stylized, surreal, sometimes funny, most of the time horrifying, look at the price of war, as well as the bonds of brotherhood, nation, [...]

    7. I heard a performance of this play on BBC Radio 3 last year and it came across as a powerful piece. The play has toured the world (or at least the US in 2007) to great acclaim. On the page however it just seems like a lot (and I mean a lot) of swearing. Not as funny as Gagarin Way but then it's not a funny subject (Iraq war and the changes to centuries old Scottish regiments).Guardian reviewGuardian on Gregory BurkeNational Theatre of Scotland Black Watch pages.

    8. It is interesting how the play is set up and the (hi-)story is definitely thrilling. However. I do not want to believe that men, soldiers, people actually converse in such a vulgar way.If you don't like EXTENSIVE swearing you should not read/watch this play. Don't. Additionally, the dialogues are mainly Scottish, which is not easy to follow (at least for people with English as a second language only).

    9. Possibly my favorite play I've ever seen. I saw the play in Glasgow before reading it, which I think was the right way to go about it. It is definitely best when viewed live as opposed to read, because the choreography and different aspects of the set are so incredible. There's a reason why this is such a hit in Scotland and abroad!

    10. I watched the play on DVD and then read it afterwards. I thoroughly enjoyed the play. For a topic that I don't normally engage in, it was witty, fast paced and humorous which broke up the sheer horror and scariness of the situation. I also learnt a lot about Scotland's Black Watch and its heritage.

    11. This is probably another play that I need to experience, rather than just read. The language was particularly vulgar, which was off-putting. As a piece of verbatim theatre, it was an intriguing insight into the Black Watch regiment's identity and the state of their morale during and after the events.

    12. Together with the performance, it is a highly significant piece that represents and confronts the issues of Scottish nationhood and national identity.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *