The Art of the American Snapshot, 1888-1978: From the Collection of Robert E. Jackson

The Art of the American Snapshot From the Collection of Robert E Jackson The impact of the humble American snapshot has been anything but humble Any American who takes a snapshot contributes to a compelling and influential genre Since when George Eastman introduced t

  • Title: The Art of the American Snapshot, 1888-1978: From the Collection of Robert E. Jackson
  • Author: Sarah Greenough Diane Waggoner Sarah Kennel Matthew S. Witkovsky
  • ISBN: 9780691133683
  • Page: 390
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The impact of the humble American snapshot has been anything but humble Any American who takes a snapshot contributes to a compelling and influential genre Since 1888, when George Eastman introduced the Kodak camera and roll film, the snapshot has not only changed everyday American life and memory it has also changed the history of fine art photography The distinctiveThe impact of the humble American snapshot has been anything but humble Any American who takes a snapshot contributes to a compelling and influential genre Since 1888, when George Eastman introduced the Kodak camera and roll film, the snapshot has not only changed everyday American life and memory it has also changed the history of fine art photography The distinctive subject matter and visual vocabulary of the American snapshot its poses, facial expressions, viewpoints, framing, and themes influenced modernist photographers as they explored spontaneity, objectivity, and new topics and perspectives A richly illustrated chronicle of the first century of snapshot photography in America, The Art of the American Snapshot is the first book to examine the evolution of this most common form of American photography The book shows that among the countless snapshots taken by American amateurs, some works, through intention or accident, continue to resonate long after their intimate context and original meaning have been lost The catalogue of a fall 2007 exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, The Art of the American Snapshot reproduces some 250 snapshots drawn from Robert Jackson s outstanding collection and from a recent gift Jackson made to the museum Organized decade by decade, the book traces the evolution of American snapshot imagery and describes how technical, social, and cultural factors affected the look of snapshots at different periods.

    One thought on “The Art of the American Snapshot, 1888-1978: From the Collection of Robert E. Jackson”

    1. This book was equally haunting and touching. For me, the best part of visiting elderly relatives was staying up late after everyone else had gone to sleep and taking down the sturdy shoe boxes from the closet to look at old snapshots from the 1940s through the 1960s. The great thing about photographs of this time is that if the film was developed, a print of each exposure almost certainly existed. So many prints in this book were what my Grandmother would call "mistakes"- but because most modern [...]

    2. A nice history of film photography. The text frequently referred to photographs on some other page. Would have been better to organize things so the reader doesn't have to flip back and forth through the book while reading it. After a while I just read the words and looked at the pictures later. More bettah.I didn't know the word "snapshot" originally referred to a hunter getting off a quick shot at his quarry before it scurried away. I have sometimes felt like a gunman carrying my camera in a b [...]

    3. Extremely well written without being heavy handed on the history/evolution of snapshot photography in America. Fascinating as hell and made even more so with the excellent example images. This reads as more of an overview and not an extreme in depth analysis, so if that's what you're looking for check elsewhere. Highly recommended, even just got the pictures themselves.

    4. I got this for Christmas from Maeve! Awesome. We saw the exhibit at the National Gallery of Art, and it was fantastic. I mentioned to Maeve that every snapshot was its own writing prompt.I'm looking forward to reading it and to maybe cranking out some short stories

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