The Courage of Truth: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-1984

The Courage of Truth Lectures at the Coll ge de France The Courage of the Truth is the last course that Michel Foucault delivered at the Coll ge de France Here he continues the theme of the previous year s lectures in exploring the notion of truth tellin

  • Title: The Courage of Truth: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-1984
  • Author: Michel Foucault Arnold I. Davidson Graham Burchell
  • ISBN: 9780230112889
  • Page: 369
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Courage of the Truth is the last course that Michel Foucault delivered at the Coll ge de France Here, he continues the theme of the previous year s lectures in exploring the notion of truth telling in politics to establish a number of ethically irreducible conditions based on courage and conviction His death, on June 25th, 1984, tempts us to detect the philosophicaThe Courage of the Truth is the last course that Michel Foucault delivered at the Coll ge de France Here, he continues the theme of the previous year s lectures in exploring the notion of truth telling in politics to establish a number of ethically irreducible conditions based on courage and conviction His death, on June 25th, 1984, tempts us to detect the philosophical testament in these lectures, especially in view of the prominence they give to the themes of life and death.

    One thought on “The Courage of Truth: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-1984”

    1. Some quotes in my translation:The bios philosophikos, as right life, is the animality of human being held up as a challenge, practised as an exercise, and thrown in the face of others as a scandal. (p245) Being sovereign over oneself and being useful to others, enjoying oneself and oneself alone, and at the same time bringing to others the help they need in their predicament, their difficulties or even their misfortunes, that basically constitutes one and the same thing. It is the same foundatio [...]

    2. An elegant, satisfying argument, less ultimately about free speech than about the type of self-care (or self-government) that a particular sort of free speech leads to. From the title, I was expecting a bit more Mike-of-the-barricades, and got instead an extension of the governmentality writings; this actually, pervert that I am, was maybe more exciting. There's a lot of interesting stuff here that I'm sure is going to be making its way into academic articles, to the extent that it hasn't alread [...]

    3. Full text: xitsuka.wordpress/2015/11Once we understood that, behind the veil of parrhesia there always is the issue of realization or bringing into consciousness, many of the discussion Foucault did would be rendered redundant. We talk about self-awareness from time to time; we know that it means bringing awareness to ourselves. And the notion of satori is nothing but bringing awareness into things not just restricted to ourselves — a turn of attention into various things or beings, through wh [...]

    4. In this last volume of Michel Foucault's lectures at the College de France the controversial philosopher examines the role of truth telling and its connection to the "arts of living" he examined in his last major works in the History of Sexuality. The lectures illuminate Foucault's own understanding of ethics, which he understood in terms of self-stylization. According to many commentators, this approach ignores the very "stuff" of morality; namely, our relations to others. As the lectures indic [...]

    5. The most compelling book (of philosophy) I've read in a long time: a history of the varieties of truth-telling as political, ethical and religious practices from ancient Greece through early Christianity; including major re-evaluations of Socrates, the Cynics and Christian ascetics; with seemingly endless implications for individual spirituality, political struggle and pedagogy. I'm most excited about Foucault's re-description of philosophy as the study and practice of three inter-dependent mode [...]

    6. Uhm, truth telling, Cynicism, Socrates. Being a cynic is being a warrior in life. Seeing as he dies a few months after these lectures are done, I see it as a way for him to let go, and find integrity in the moment of death. Maybe I am taking it far, but classic Foucault leaves the reader almost hopeless, whereas the final sections reflect on god, and what truth telling means spiritually, even though it is through a critical lens. You also notice in parts him talking about his health not feeling [...]

    7. The lectures at the College de France are always captivating. But when Michel Foucault is the one teaching, he takes the experience to a whole new level. The question of democracy, of the role of people in the government of a nation, is more important that ever in these dark ages. Using ancient greek texts, Foucault makes us think about today's governments, and how all is going wrong, far from what meant democracy in the first place. I can't do anything else but recommending this book to anyone [...]

    8. No sé si haya sido correcto empezar por el final, pero ciertamente me ha abierto el camino hacia la indagación del trabajo del autor. Sé de antemano que no me va satisfacer todo el resto de la obra, dado que este libro es su conclusión y no lo logró. Es quizás notable el desarrollo de su noción de crítica, bastante notable diría yo y bueno, siempre e han gustado las relecturas de los clásicos como vigentes.Muy buen libro con lenguaje poco sofisticado pero no por ello poco cuidadoso. De [...]

    9. This text of Foucault lectures covers the long tradition of parrhesia with an excellent movement from Socrates to the Cynics. As a committed and emerging member of the Society of Gentle Cynics, I enjoyed and benefited from his interpretation and descriptions. I have begun to write some of this learning in one of my blogs, Notes of a Gentle Cynic [gentlecynic/]. The findings will be shared in parts under the main title of "Gentle Cynicism as True Life."

    10. Foucault died a couple months after the completion of this lecture course. His health was obviously failing. I just about broke down in tears while reading the last few pages.It's fitting that his last two courses were about parrhesia (basically, courageous truth-telling) and the aesthetics of existence. This dude did it right."But, well, it is too late. Thank you."

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