Border Games: Policing the U.S.-Mexico Divide

Border Games Policing the U S Mexico Divide The U S Mexico border is the busiest in the world the longest and most dramatic meeting point of a rich and poor country and the site of intense confrontation between law enforcement and law evasion

  • Title: Border Games: Policing the U.S.-Mexico Divide
  • Author: Peter Andreas
  • ISBN: 9780801487569
  • Page: 124
  • Format: Paperback
  • The U.S Mexico border is the busiest in the world, the longest and most dramatic meeting point of a rich and poor country, and the site of intense confrontation between law enforcement and law evasion Border control has changed in recent years from a low maintenance and politically marginal activity to an intensive campaign focusing on drugs and migrant labor Yet the unThe U.S Mexico border is the busiest in the world, the longest and most dramatic meeting point of a rich and poor country, and the site of intense confrontation between law enforcement and law evasion Border control has changed in recent years from a low maintenance and politically marginal activity to an intensive campaign focusing on drugs and migrant labor Yet the unprecedented buildup of border policing has taken place in an era otherwise defined by the opening of the border, most notably through NAFTA This contrast creates a borderless economy with a barricaded border Peter Andreas argues that the sharp escalation in law enforcement provides a political mechanism for coping with the unintended consequences of past policy choices Law enforcement is enthusiastically embraced as a remedy for the very problems state practices have helped to create The high profile display of force, Andreas emphasizes, has ultimately been less about deterring illegal crossings and about re crafting the image of the border and symbolically reaffirming the state s territorial authority.Extending the analysis to the borders of the European Union, Andreas identifies different forms of law enforcement escalation that reflect distinct historical legacies and regional contexts Andreas challenges the notion that borders are irrelevant in an age of globalization and stresses that, rather than eroding, some critical borders are being reinforced and remade.

    One thought on “Border Games: Policing the U.S.-Mexico Divide”

    1. Assigned for a class I ended up dropping. Read it anyway. Mildly interesting, but very slow reading, although not super dense--it's hard to explain. It's one of those books where the entire argument is laid out in the introduction, so I think it's only my sense of commitment that drove me to read the whole thing. Moderately interesting, as I've said, but if it hadn't been for that class I wouldn't have bothered.

    2. An interesting read to understand how borders work. The US-Mexico border is linked to other examples to highlight the political issues surrounding borders. I think it was an important read to understand the history of politics when this is so prominent in the news right now with political candidates promising to build a war.

    3. An interesting concept with a narrow scope looking out policing and smuggling on the border, and how the border is used as a political theater while allowing illicit activities to continue and using policy to shape the illicit market through criminalization of select goods. This line seems to sum things up nicely - "upid policies can be smart politics"

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