Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age it may contain imperfections such as marks notations marginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is c

  • Title: Vanity Fair
  • Author: William Makepeace Thackeray
  • ISBN: 9781417900312
  • Page: 150
  • Format: Paperback
  • This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world s literature in affordable, high quality, modernThis scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world s literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

    One thought on “Vanity Fair”

    1. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray- What I admire most about Becky Sharp is her Determination. She is poor, but finds a way out of her predicament. Even when she is in debt and back at ground level Becky Does Not Give up!- Never!This is an extraordinary woman, admirable also because of her shortcomings- in spite of the negative traits holding her back, she is Unstoppable! What she has in her mind- her Goals are always pursued with an amazing Tenacity and… Will to PowerHow strange and u [...]

    2. A biting and witty satire on English social life and customs during the first part of the nineteenth century, its subtitle is “a novel without a hero,” and it could also be added without heroines. Yet the book’s two central characters, the virtuous but dim and naive Amelia Sedley and the amoral, clever, congenial Becky Sharp both display admirable and distressing qualities as they rise, fall, and rise again in society. One of the great virtues of Vanity Fair is that while it is told in hil [...]

    3. Thackeray's opus is a wonder. Long, yes, but so very good in so many ways.He's part Oscar Wilde, part Jonathan Swift, with a dash of Dickens, but all his own voice.Since the story is so long and sprawling, I only jotted down a few notes on my impressions.* He breaks the 4th wall, some times with savage glee, yanking it down making you look at yourself and the characters in a new light. Other times he does it with delicacy, sliding back the wall and making you feel like it's just him and you in t [...]

    4. Thackery is bitingly witty and cleverly satirical in this commentary on societal niceties. Although the term did not exist at the time, his portrayal of Becky Sharp is an excellent profile of a sociopath - charming, eloquent, manipulative, selfish, and erudite. Amelia is so virtuous her very virtuousness becomes a fault. It was not quite as predictable as my first impression predicted, and that pleased me. My difficulty with this novel was its length - 1600 pages on my e-reader - and with so muc [...]

    5. By: William Makepeace Thackeray. Grade A+The first thing that grasped me as I began the novel ‘Vanity Fair’ was the immense confidence of the author, William Makepeace Thackeray. He doesn’t just assert his confidence in every word of his masterpiece, but proclaims it boldly in the very title by calling his book ‘Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero.’Yes, a novel without a hero! But ‘a novel without a hero’ it definitely isn’t. Those words are just a satire on the heroes of common [...]

    6. my edition was in one volume and printed in1898 or 68. difficult to read date. interesting scenes around eourope but i think it would have been more intesting to the people living there in the 1800s.

    7. This is one of my all-time favorite books. There is a lot of depth to the story, I enjoy the strong authorial voice and the philosophy in the book. It was great fiction, but what I really appreciated was the statement "and this is vanity fair"or "this too was vanity". Definitely a must read.

    8. Found it a bit too "long winded" but probably typical of the writing of the time. The end left nothing to the imagination.

    9. Dated in a way that many other (better?) novels of the same period aren't. Found it a bit of a struggle to stay engaged for the duration

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