The Trouble with Nature: Sex in Science and Popular Culture

The Trouble with Nature Sex in Science and Popular Culture Roger N Lancaster provides the definitive rebuttal of evolutionary just so stories about men women and the nature of desire in this spirited expos of the heterosexual fables that pervade popular cul

  • Title: The Trouble with Nature: Sex in Science and Popular Culture
  • Author: Roger N. Lancaster
  • ISBN: 9780520236202
  • Page: 449
  • Format: Paperback
  • Roger N Lancaster provides the definitive rebuttal of evolutionary just so stories about men, women, and the nature of desire in this spirited expos of the heterosexual fables that pervade popular culture, from prime time sitcoms to scientific theories about the so called gay gene Lancaster links the recent resurgence of biological explanations for gender norms, sexualRoger N Lancaster provides the definitive rebuttal of evolutionary just so stories about men, women, and the nature of desire in this spirited expos of the heterosexual fables that pervade popular culture, from prime time sitcoms to scientific theories about the so called gay gene Lancaster links the recent resurgence of biological explanations for gender norms, sexual desires, and human nature in general with the current pitched battles over sexual politics Ideas about a hardwired and immutable human nature are circulating at a pivotal moment in human history, he argues, one in which dramatic changes in gender roles and an unprecedented normalization of lesbian and gay relationships are challenging received notions and commonly held convictions on every front.The Trouble with Nature takes on major media sources the New York Times, Newsweek and widely ballyhooed scientific studies and ideas to show how journalists, scientists, and others invoke the rhetoric of science to support political positions in the absence of any real evidence Lancaster also provides a novel and dramatic analysis of the social, historical, and political backdrop for changing discourses on nature, including an incisive critique of the failures of queer theory to understand the social conflicts of the moment By showing how reductivist explanations for sexual orientation lean on essentialist ideas about gender, Lancaster invites us to think deeply and creatively about human acts and social relations.

    One thought on “The Trouble with Nature: Sex in Science and Popular Culture”

    1. Lancaster's sort of snarky commentary on the movement to "naturalize" sex, gender, and sexuality was a real treat in my undergraduate anthropology class. For anthropologists, queer theorists, or eggheaded nerdy types with a sense of humor, this book pulls together a lot of aspects of the possible outcomes of studying desire "scientifically".

    2. So maybe it wasn't a book that I picked up on my own from a bookstore. But so what that I had to read it for Anthropological Theory class? I loved it!This book is education, yes; but at the same time, Lancaster's quirky sense of humor makes it much more fun than your average "I-was-assigned-to-read-this-book-so-shoot-me-now" required reading material. I particularly enjoyed the sections dealing with the "science" of homosexuality. Lancaster makes it clear that he does not "believe in" a "gay gen [...]

    3. What does it mean to be a man? To what extent is it genetic? This book places scientific arguments of the possible genetics of gender and sexuality ("Is there a gay gene?") into their cultural contexts by examining popular culture representations of sexuality, gender, family and intimacy including news media, advertisements, and television shows. Lancaster identifies the echoes of scientific racism and eugenicist thought in the search for a gay gene. Moreover, he points out that while identity t [...]

    4. ILL gave back before vacation and get when I come backmarie clare at L and C is using this book in May 2012TOCIn the Beginning, Nature -- The Normal Body -- The Human Design -- Our Animals, Our Selves -- The Science Question: Cultural Preoccupations and Social Struggles -- Sexual Selection: Eager, Aggressive Boy Meets Coy, Choosy Girl -- The Selfish Gene -- Genomania and Heterosexual Fetishism -- Biological Beauty and the Straight Arrow of Desire -- Homo Faber, Family Man -- T-Power -- Nature's [...]

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