Hymns for the Drowning

Hymns for the Drowning The poems in this book are some of the earliest about Visnu one of the Hindu Trinity also known as Tirumal the Dark One Tradition recognizes twelve alvars saint poets devoted to Visnu who lived b

  • Title: Hymns for the Drowning
  • Author: Nammalvar A.K. Ramanujan
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 227
  • Format: Paperback
  • The poems in this book are some of the earliest about Visnu, one of the Hindu Trinity, also known as Tirumal, the Dark One.Tradition recognizes twelve alvars, saint poets devoted to Visnu, who lived between the sixth and ninth century in the Tamil speaking region of south India These devotees of Visnu and their counterparts, the devotees of Siva nayanmar , changed and reThe poems in this book are some of the earliest about Visnu, one of the Hindu Trinity, also known as Tirumal, the Dark One.Tradition recognizes twelve alvars, saint poets devoted to Visnu, who lived between the sixth and ninth century in the Tamil speaking region of south India These devotees of Visnu and their counterparts, the devotees of Siva nayanmar , changed and revitalized Hinduism and their devotional hymns addressed to Visnu are among the earliest bhakti devotional texts in any Indian language.In this selection from Nammalvar s works, the translations like the originals reflect the alternations of philosophic hymns and love poems, through recurring voices, roles and places They also enact a progression from wonder at the Lord s works, to the experience of loving him and watching others love him, to moods of questioning and despair and finally to the experience of being devoured and possessed by him.

    One thought on “Hymns for the Drowning”

    1. Nammalvar was one of the twelve Alvars, well-known for his many hymns on devotion to Vishnu. Tradition gives him the date 3102 B.C. (i.e the beginning of the kali yuga). He was born in the asterism Visakham, in what is now Alwarthirunagiri (also known as Tirukkurugur), Tamil Nadu. His name means "our own alvar" (alvar means "one immersed in God"). He was also known as Maran and Satakopan.He must have been born fully enlightened because as a baby he never cried or suckled and never opened his eye [...]

    2. Although the book has a few great poems, it feels quite dry to read. Many metaphors and similes must have been lost in translation. For example, the metaphor "dark as the sea" has been used multiple times in the translation, but I am not quite sure if the original meant dark as the bottom of the sea.

    3. This is the kind of book you can read in an hour but the endnotes/appendix section will keep you occupied for much longer, if you care about all those details. And they are pretty necessary to understand some of whats going on poetically, if you dont understand Tamil.

    4. The afterword is what the book is worth for; where the author atempts to explain/trace a mosaic of esoteric philosophy.

    5. Beautiful poetry. I loved it. It's crazy how they can reference these huge stories in just a few lines. Love poetry was very touching as well.

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