Massacre at Camp Grant: Forgetting and Remembering Apache History

Massacre at Camp Grant Forgetting and Remembering Apache History On April an unlikely group of Anglo Americans Mexican Americans and Tohono O odham Indians massacred than a hundred Apache men women and children who had surrendered to the U S Army at C

  • Title: Massacre at Camp Grant: Forgetting and Remembering Apache History
  • Author: Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh
  • ISBN: 9780816525850
  • Page: 198
  • Format: Paperback
  • On April 30, 1871, an unlikely group of Anglo Americans, Mexican Americans, and Tohono O odham Indians massacred than a hundred Apache men, women, and children who had surrendered to the U.S Army at Camp Grant, near Tucson, Arizona Thirty or Apache children were stolen and either kept in Tucson homes or sold into slavery in Mexico Planned and perpetrated by soOn April 30, 1871, an unlikely group of Anglo Americans, Mexican Americans, and Tohono O odham Indians massacred than a hundred Apache men, women, and children who had surrendered to the U.S Army at Camp Grant, near Tucson, Arizona Thirty or Apache children were stolen and either kept in Tucson homes or sold into slavery in Mexico Planned and perpetrated by some of the most prominent men in Arizona s territorial era, this organized slaughter has become a kind of phantom history lurking beneath the Southwest s official history, strangely present and absent at the same time Seeking to uncover the mislaid past, this powerful book begins by listening to those voices in the historical record that have long been silenced and disregarded Massacre at Camp Grant fashions a multivocal narrative, interweaving the documentary record, Apache narratives, historical texts, and ethnographic research to provide new insights into the atrocity Thus drawing from a range of sources, it demonstrates the ways in which painful histories continue to live on in the collective memories of the communities in which they occurred Chip Colwell Chanthaphonh begins with the premise that every account of the past is suffused with cultural, historical, and political characteristics By paying attention to all of these aspects of a contested event, he provides a nuanced interpretation of the cultural forces behind the massacre, illuminates how history becomes an instrument of politics, and contemplates why we must study events we might prefer to forget.

    One thought on “Massacre at Camp Grant: Forgetting and Remembering Apache History”

    1. This is a good book on a key event in Apache history and discusses approaches on how to remember this event. The author goes into detail on the massacre at Camp Grant on April 30, 1871; he goes through the events that led up to the incident and the key players involved. I think what we should take away from this volume is that history is not black and white and that there was blame on both sides with regards to the general conflict. However, this event was unique in that the collection of Anglo- [...]

    2. A good historical review of this massacre perpetrated by Tucsonans against Apaches who were being sheltered by the US Army. Senseless slaughter but Colwell selves deeply to find stories from all sides and discusses South Africa’s Truth & Reconciliation Commission as an example of restorative justice.

    3. Very interesting book but a bit too much philosophy on the meaning of history around the slimmer content of the events of the Camp Grant Massacre.

    4. This book is not simply a retelling of the incident. Rather the author looks at the way politics, cultural beliefs, and cultural blindness to those deemed "other" shape a narrative. The author looks at the various accounts of the incident over time, what gets left in and what is left out. What becomes accepted as a "known" over time is not on as firm a ground as believed. Colwell-Chanthaphonh give the Apache account good coverage, something that has been missing, and when it is acknowledged is o [...]

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