Petrograd

Petrograd Introducing the untold tale of the international conspiracy behind the murder of Gregorii Rasputin Set during the height of the first World War the tale follows a reluctant British spy stationed in t

  • Title: Petrograd
  • Author: Philip Gelatt Tyler Crook
  • ISBN: 9781934964446
  • Page: 476
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Introducing the untold tale of the international conspiracy behind the murder of Gregorii Rasputin Set during the height of the first World War, the tale follows a reluctant British spy stationed in the heart of the Russian empire as he is handed the most difficult assignment of his career orchestrate the death of the mad monk, the Tsarina s most trusted adviser and the sIntroducing the untold tale of the international conspiracy behind the murder of Gregorii Rasputin Set during the height of the first World War, the tale follows a reluctant British spy stationed in the heart of the Russian empire as he is handed the most difficult assignment of his career orchestrate the death of the mad monk, the Tsarina s most trusted adviser and the surrogate ruler of the nation The mission will take our hero from the slums of the working class into the opulent houses of the super rich he ll have to negotiate dangerous ties with the secret police, navigate the halls of power, and come to terms with own revolutionary leanings, all while simply trying to survive Based on historical documents and research, Petrograd is a tense, edge of your seat spy thriller, taking the reader on a journey through the background of one of history s most infamous assassinations, set against the backdrop of one of the most tumultuous moments in 20th century history.

    One thought on “Petrograd”

    1. The assassination of Rasputin, the mad Russian monk who was arguably a big motivating factor in Russia overthrowing its aristocracy and becoming a communist nation for much of the 20th century, is one hell of a story. To kill Rasputin the assassins had to poison, stab, and shoot him and, to make sure he didn’t come back from that, rolled him up in a blanket and dropped into the Neva river in the dead of winter, crashing through the ice into the freezing waters below. That is one tough dude. A [...]

    2. The level of research by the creative team – from the script to the art - really shows and help make this historical fiction not only entertaining but informative as well. As I was reading Petrograd, I really felt I was witnessing history in the making. Some creative liberties were undoubtedly taken, of that I’m not fooling myself, but the version of the events surrounding the assassination of Rasputin as presented in this book is pretty convincing and definitely plausible. The art is in bla [...]

    3. EDIT: A more thorough version of my review of this book was published at Comic Book Snob.I'll admit, I mostly picked up this book because I wanted to see more illustration work from Tyler Crook, the new regular artist on John Arcudi's B.P.R.D. series. I am a big fan of Guy Davis, who left B.P.R.D. this year to work on some other projects, and I wanted to know more about the guy taking up Guy's mantle.Interestingly enough, this is Crook's first comics project, even though his first issue of B.P.R [...]

    4. Interesting take on Rasputin's assassination and the supposed involvement of british S.I.S.That last part I didn't know of so it piqued my curiosity. The first half deals with the british agent (from southern Ireland actually), his ethic interrogations (the british post is an army of 3 with only one that actually knows what he's doing here) and fears. A bit long but it builds up the character.Then comes the brutal murder and the consequences for the agent who evidently is let down by his hierarc [...]

    5. Superb historic-fictional account (based on the newest evidence) of the assassination of Rasputin.I read about Rasputin when I was a kid, and most of what I read was anti-Russian propagandistic Bullsh!t.Most of the "facts" about him are now strongly questioned.The lesson? Non-fiction has the word FICTION in it!Perhaps all history is historic-FICTION.This version of the story was plausible and both well-written and expertly illustrated.

    6. Very highly recommended! It's a gorgeous looking book, and the story and atmosphere is reminiscent of a John LeCarre spy novel. There's also a bibliography at the end which I might very well check out soon because I was quite hooked in by the story.I'm now a fan of both Gelatt and Crook.

    7. I can't quite remember how I heard about Petrograd but when I discovered that there was a historical graphic novel about the assassination of Rasputin, I knew I had to read it. Petrograd was a very different read for me; normally I speed through graphic novels only to read them again & again to let everything sink in. I went through this book much more slowly, possibly due to the detailed atmospheric panels that were on nearly every page.Gelatt's story moves quickly from the halls of power, [...]

    8. **Read via NetGalley**Petrograd is an incredibly well executed graphic novel. Set amongst the backdrop of World War I and the October Revolution, this tight espionage tale follows a conflicted British spy dealing with his own doubts and loyalties, as he is drawn into the plot to assassinate Rasputin. Far more than just an entertaining and stylish read, I was surprising by how successful it was in grabbing my attention. Philip Gelatt creates a layered and quickly paced narrative which, while set [...]

    9. Petrograd by Philip Gelatt and Tyler Crook is a historic thriller in a graphic novel format due to released on August 3 2011. Rasputin and the events of Russian Revolution of 1916 have consistently been a subject of great curiosity and interest. Petrograd takes a close look at the people and powers of the time, and speculates on exactly how Rasputin was really murdered. No one knows the whole, true story, but the version of events in this graphic novel seem quite realistic and connect well the t [...]

    10. Mediocre novel. Great artwork. Rasputin is one of those figures in Russian history who is shrouded in legend. How you make this bizarre chapter in Russian history unexceptional and even boring is beyond me but somehow the author achieves this. Next time he might not want to base his book largely on Anglo-centric sources like the problematic Orlando Figes. Also, the scene where a Russian peasant woman embarrasingly apologies to the English main character for being subject to a "backwards" society [...]

    11. Nearly 100 years after his death, the Russian holy man Grigori Rasputin, intimate advisor to the Tsarina Alexandra and healer of her son Alexei, remains one of history's more enigmatic figures. Petrograd reveals the untold plot behind the Mad Monk's assassination -- political, social, and romantic. What role did the British consulate play? Which of the bourgeoisie formulated the plan? How exactly were the Bolsheviks involved? Gelatt's well-crafted script combined with Crook's incredible draftsma [...]

    12. Very nicely researched book. Well-written, intriguing in many aspects. Loved the art as well, beautiful pen and ink work, very organic, and loved the simple orange tones. The art style vibed nicely with the story and historical context. The story revolves around a British secret service agent with the backdrop of WWI, the burgeoning communist revolution in Russia, and the flash point being the plotting and murder of Rasputin. I'm sure there was a lot of creative license in the storytelling in re [...]

    13. This was an excellent blend of historical fiction and spy thriller, two genres that aren't normally associated with graphic novels.

    14. I love and really appreciate historical graphic novels. I found this book randomly at my beloved St. Heliers, Auckland Library (plug) and devoured it. I didn't know St. Petersburg was once called Petrograd shortly. I was unfamiliar with this sliver of time in history and this book has helped unveil a part of the past in my mind brain skull head thing. This book covers the assassination of Rasputin, the British SIS involvement in Russia at the time and the events leading up to the February Revolu [...]

    15. Absolute brilliant telling of the lead up and aftermath of the British involvement in the assassination of Rasputin. Gelatt based the story on historical documents and research and does a fantastic job pacing it through the graphic novel. This is probably the best artwork I've seen from Tyler Crook, his line art and colors absolutely shine. I cannot recommend this enough for genre fans or comic fans.

    16. Here's some attention to detail: if you just open the front cover, you'll see the front endpaper is blazoned with the double-headed eagle of the Russian Empire (slightly altered); and if you flip to the back endpaper, you'll see it's hammer-and-sickle time. In other words, you know how this story goes, from the Tsar's empire to the Soviet Union. Philip Gelatt wisely avoids that macro-historical sweep to focus instead on one smaller story--the assassination of Rasputin and its aftermath; and to f [...]

    17. 1916. Petrograd, Russia.The eastern front of the Great War is raging on just outside the city limits. Within the metropolis, a different struggle is emerging. Revolutionaries, sick and tired of the famine and poverty that’s destroying the population, plans to overthrow the current ruler, Tsar Nicolas II.Across town, a daring plan is being formed by a small fraction of the recently formed British Secret Intelligence Service. News has reached the British that the Russians seem to negotiate peace [...]

    18. Petrograd is, as its synopsis so aptly puts it, a graphic novel about the plot to kill Rasputin. Set in WWI Russia, the tale is told through the eyes of an English spy, Cleary, who is caught between duty to country and his own shifting convictions.Rasputin is a fascinating character, partly because Americans like to pretend they could never understand him - he must just be a Russian thing. Except, he's not. Rasputin plays his victims like any other grifter - giving them the false hope they need [...]

    19. Pet­ro­grad by Philip Gelatt (art by Tyler Crook) is a graphic novel about an assas­si­na­tion. The graphic nov­els tells about an inter­na­tional con­spir­acy behind the mur­der of Gre­gorii Rasputin.World War I is rav­aging the world. Hunger, depres­sion and despair reign while only hard core rev­o­lu­tion­ar­ies at the bot­tom of the food chain and those in the upper ech­e­lons of gov­ern­ment cling to a drop of hope.The pow­ers that be think that Rasputin is urg­ing [...]

    20. Huh. A graphic novel about the Rasputin's assassination and the Russian Revolution. Not what I normally think of when I think of sitting down to read a graphic novel.Petrograd is a seemingly well-researched story from Phillip Gelatt and illustrated by Tyler Cook. When I first started reading it, I was put off by the whole thing. It was history, it was an extremely muted palette - which seemed so obvious, and it just didn't appeal to me.BUT WAIT! I started to really read it. I started to really w [...]

    21. Philip Gelatt's "Petrograd" makes an interesting reading with strong political message. Spying is so spread-out in comics, which makes it hard for a writer to accomplish a good story with it. Philip Gelatt succeeded with "Petrograd" in leveling the story with ideology in just the right way, and admittedly while he writes about one of the most controversial characters in the history of Russia, he dodged bullets of overreacting and pathetic in most places. That's for positives. As for negatives, R [...]

    22. Petrograd by Philip Gelatt is set during the middle of the first world war, when a British spy stationed in Petrograd is tasked to kill the Tsar's trusted adviser, The Mad Monk Rasputin. While working towards this goal he must navigate the streets of a city ready to explode, meeting with revolutionaries and secret police alike.This is a fantastic book with wonderful illustrations by Tyler Crook. The twists and turns and layers of this book along the people Cleary the spy must interact with reall [...]

    23. I thought there were a lot of good things in this semi-history of Rasputin's assassination, but there were two problems that really made it difficult on me:1. Very few characters are ever really introduced. I have no particular problem with this in principle--letting the readers discover who they are via the dialogue would be fine--except that the pseudo-monochrome made it quite difficult to tell characters apart when you don't really know who is who yet.2. The ending feels like it has just been [...]

    24. Russian lore is filled with tales about the mad monk known as Rasputin. In Tyler Crook's graphic novel, we explore the rumblings of the plot designed to eliminate the crwon's advisor and its effects on its conspirators. Englishman Cleary is part of the British SIS intelligence agency, assigned to report on the goings-on in the Russian territories. As word reaches his boss of a possible partnership between the tsarina and German government, Cleary is sent to put into motion a plan that will preve [...]

    25. Many times, different assassins tried to take Rasputin out. You've probably heard the story of the most famous attempt: first, a group of conspirators invited Rasputin to their home and poisoned him. Then they shot him. Then they threw him into the river. Russia is always cold, but this happened in the middle of winter. Naturally, Rasputin shows up for work the next day carrying on as if absolutely nothing happened. There is not a scratch on him.This is the story of Russia during World War I. Be [...]

    26. Historic-fictional at its finest set in 1916 (during WW I) surrounding the murder of Rasputin and the start of the Russian Revolution. A British spy is assigned to prevent Russia from making peace with Germany (to keep Germany from focusing all of its military on England) by ensuring the assassination of Rasputin, the religious monk adviser to the Tsar's wife. Knowing nothing of WW I, the Russian Revolution or of Rasputin (other than what I read on Cracked about the murder of Rasputin cracked/ar [...]

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