Drinking, Homicide, and Rebellion in Colonial Mexican Villages

Drinking Homicide and Rebellion in Colonial Mexican Villages This study analyzes the impact of Spanish rule on Indian peasant identity in the late colonial period by investigating three areas of social behavior Based on the criminal trial records and related do

  • Title: Drinking, Homicide, and Rebellion in Colonial Mexican Villages
  • Author: William B. Taylor
  • ISBN: 9780804711128
  • Page: 230
  • Format: Paperback
  • This study analyzes the impact of Spanish rule on Indian peasant identity in the late colonial period by investigating three areas of social behavior Based on the criminal trial records and related documents from the regions of central Mexico and Oaxaca, it attempts to discover how peasants conceived of their role under Spanish rule, how they behaved under various kinds oThis study analyzes the impact of Spanish rule on Indian peasant identity in the late colonial period by investigating three areas of social behavior Based on the criminal trial records and related documents from the regions of central Mexico and Oaxaca, it attempts to discover how peasants conceived of their role under Spanish rule, how they behaved under various kinds of street, and how they felt about their Spanish overlords.In examining the character of village uprisings, typical relationships between killers and the people they killed, and the drinking patterns of the late colonial period, the author finds no warrant for the familiar picture of sullen depredation and despair Landed peasants of colonial Mexico drank moderately on the whole, and mostly on ritual occasions they killed for personal and not political reasons Only when new Spanish encroachments threatened their lands and livelihoods did their grievances flare up in rebellion, and these occasions were numerous but brief The author bolsters his conclusions with illuminating comparisons with other peasant societies.

    One thought on “Drinking, Homicide, and Rebellion in Colonial Mexican Villages”

    1. This book, Drinking, Homicide, and Rebellion in Colonial Mexican Villages, is well organized and straight to the point, the introductory chapter tries to explain what was the colonial life in Mexico life. The title introduces the three behaviors Taylor primarily focuses on, on the behavior of the natives of colonial Mexico are the proceeding chapters. Taylor concludes that drinking did become more frequent between the natives. He suggests that the pressures of the colonizers may have led for the [...]

    2. Taylor's book is a true insight and a revision of history to explain the social demisions of Native peoples of Mexico under Spanish Colonial rule. Being more of a social history, the revision refutes the common assumption in certain histories of Native Mexican peoples as drunks. Taylor also sets out to prove that even though the social traits of the Native peoples is different from Colonial Government, they did adapt and rebel. An interesting read that has some real good first hand accounts of N [...]

    3. This title was recommended to me by a noted Latin American historian. Being more familiar with 17th- and 18th-century Indian-European relations in British North America and New France, I was eager to explore the communities of colonial Mexico. The book provided some fascinating insights and the historiography is commendable. The prose is solid, but probably geared a bit too much for an academic audience to make the book widely accessible to casual readers.

    4. I may have shouted "Give me Narrative or Give me Death!!" at multiple points while plowing through Taylor's work. God bless him and other social historians for their concrete contributions to the field, but I challenge someone to find less engaging way to discuss 3 generally lively topics.

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