My Own Private Germany: Daniel Paul Schreber's Secret History of Modernity

My Own Private Germany Daniel Paul Schreber s Secret History of Modernity In November Daniel Paul Schreber recently named presiding judge of the Saxon Supreme Court was on the verge of a psychotic breakdown and entered a Leipzig psychiatric clinic He would spend the

  • Title: My Own Private Germany: Daniel Paul Schreber's Secret History of Modernity
  • Author: Eric L. Santner
  • ISBN: 9780691026282
  • Page: 430
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In November 1893, Daniel Paul Schreber, recently named presiding judge of the Saxon Supreme Court, was on the verge of a psychotic breakdown and entered a Leipzig psychiatric clinic He would spend the rest of the nineteenth century in mental institutions Once released, he published his Memoirs of My Nervous Illness 1903 , a harrowing account of real and delusional perseIn November 1893, Daniel Paul Schreber, recently named presiding judge of the Saxon Supreme Court, was on the verge of a psychotic breakdown and entered a Leipzig psychiatric clinic He would spend the rest of the nineteenth century in mental institutions Once released, he published his Memoirs of My Nervous Illness 1903 , a harrowing account of real and delusional persecution, political intrigue, and states of sexual ecstasy as God s private concubine Freud s famous case study of Schreber elevated the Memoirs into the most important psychiatric textbook of paranoia In light of Eric Santner s analysis, Schreber s text becomes legible as a sort of nerve bible of fin de si

    One thought on “My Own Private Germany: Daniel Paul Schreber's Secret History of Modernity”

    1. An excellent study of Schreber, cited by Zizek throughout the mid-90s and onwards if that's your kind of thing. Santner's reading of Schreber is really admirably flexible and supple, and he even takes a conciliatory stance towards Freud, but sometimes he struts his stuff a bit, gets a bit too absolute. Really lovely though, and very useful for a wide range of fields. Great little reading of Certeau near the end too, and his employment of Sedgwick was so elegant I started laughing in dumb fucking [...]

    2. Santner slowely develops a daring and inspiring theory of modernity by closely reading Schreber's Memoirs together with a number of Schreber's contemporaries. He intertwines Freud's reading of the Schreber case with institutional crisis of psychoanalysis, Benjamin's remarks on decay and violence, Foucault's insights in the 19th century progress of psychiatry, the rise of anti-Semitism in the 19th century, and Kafka's fictional world. It took me a couple of days to read the book, the argumentatio [...]

    3. Daniel Schreber was crazy. What this book points out is Schreber was less crazy than his parents and Germany society is even crazier still!

    4. An in-depth and comprehensive study of Schreber, Santner's book further develops the ideologic analysis of Schreber.

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