The Silent Partner

The Silent Partner This historic book may have numerous typos missing text images or index Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book without typos from the publisher Not illustrated Excerp

  • Title: The Silent Partner
  • Author: Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
  • ISBN: 9781150396724
  • Page: 379
  • Format: Paperback
  • This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book without typos from the publisher 1899 Not illustrated Excerpt CHAPTER VIII A TROUBLESOME CHARACTER LD Bijah Mudge stepped painfully over a DEGREES DEGREES tub of yellow ochre and crossed the printroom at the overseer s beThis historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book without typos from the publisher 1899 Not illustrated Excerpt CHAPTER VIII A TROUBLESOME CHARACTER LD Bijah Mudge stepped painfully over a DEGREES DEGREES tub of yellow ochre and crossed the printroom at the overseer s beck There had been an order of some kind, but he was growing deaf, and the heavy engines were on The overseer repeated it Sir I said your notice, did n t I I say your DEGREESotice, don t I You ll work your notice, you A a ah said Bijah, drawing a long breath He stood and knotted his lean fingers together, watching the yellow dye drop off Is there a reason given, sir No reason Folks my age ain t often ordered on notice without reason, said the old man, feebly Folks your age should be particular how they give satisfaction, said the overseer, significantly I ve known o cases as where a boss has guessed at a reason, on his own hook, you know Jim Irish Jim was in the print rooms at Hayle and Kelso at that time Some said the new partner had a finger in getting him out of the weavingroom It was a sharp fellow, and belonged somewhere Here he would be brutal to old men and little boys but there were no girls in the printroom Oh his own hook and at a guess, said the boss, a man might ask who testified to Boston on a recent little hour bill as we know of testified, cried the old man, shrilly, before a committee of the Legislature of the State of Massachusetts I d do it ag in, Jim In the face of my notice, I d do it ag in At the risk o the poor us, I d do it ag in I call Hayle and Kelso to witness as I d do it ag in In the name of the State of Massachusetts, I d do it ag in Do it again said Jim, with a brutal oath Who hinders you But there were no reasons added the overseer, sharply You fail to give satisfaction, that s all there s no reasons I a

    One thought on “The Silent Partner”

    1. This volume, which contains a novel plus a novella/long short story, is difficult, at first to appreciate, since it is written in a rather stiff "19th C" style, that is remote from today's world. Some of the style, especially in the portrayals of the society personalities, is meant to heighten irony, is a way to slyly mock stiff personages - but the reader only appreciates this about a third of the way through the book. The novella "The Tenth of January" is a shattering portrayal of a tragic rel [...]

    2. An excellent novel detailing factory conditions and workers' lives. While I can see and would expect many contemporary readers to see it less as a novel ('work of art,' 'story') than as a documentary polemic simply reconfigured into novel form or simply a dated 'political' piece, Phelps' stark yet understated meeting of content and style builds a fully realized world and full characters that quickly took away all the doubt I had coming into it, for the same reasons listed above. The buried narra [...]

    3. Including perhaps the most sensational and bizarre death-by-water scene in 19th century fiction, this novel is by turns bold and melodramatic, engaging and frustrating. Compare to Gaskell's *North and South* as a proto-feminist narrative about labor relations.

    4. This was surprisingly good- a Christian-minded activist novel about the industrial revolution. Read for my American Lit class. I was impressed by the powerful, independent female lead, and the two chess scenes are impeccably written.

    5. Interesting critique of capitalist exploitation of factory workers, especially females, in late 19th century New England.

    6. Patrizza Bizzell wrote a paper talking, in part, about this book. It's been a delight, especially after reading Easterley. What's up with humanitarianism, anyway?

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