Popular Fiction by Women, 1660-1730

Popular Fiction by Women Popular Fiction by Women gathers together for the first time a representative selection of shorter fiction by the most successful women writers of the period from Aphra Behn the first impor

  • Title: Popular Fiction by Women, 1660-1730
  • Author: Paula R. Backscheider John J. Richetti
  • ISBN: 9780198711377
  • Page: 147
  • Format: Paperback
  • Popular Fiction by Women 1660 1730 gathers together for the first time a representative selection of shorter fiction by the most successful women writers of the period, from Aphra Behn the first important English female professional writer, to Penelope Aubin and Eliza Haywood, who with Daniel Defoe dominated prose fiction in the 1720s The texts included were among the besPopular Fiction by Women 1660 1730 gathers together for the first time a representative selection of shorter fiction by the most successful women writers of the period, from Aphra Behn the first important English female professional writer, to Penelope Aubin and Eliza Haywood, who with Daniel Defoe dominated prose fiction in the 1720s The texts included were among the best selling titles of their time, and played a key role in the expanding market for narrative in the early eighteenth century Crucial to the development of the longer novel of manners and morals that emerged in the mid eighteenth century these novellas have been much neglected by literary historians but now with the impetus of feminist criticism they have been re established as an essential chapter in the history of the novel in English and are widely studied Though strikingly varied in narrative format and purpose, ranging as they do from the erotic and sensational to the sentimental and pious, they offer a distinct fictional approach to the moral and social issues of the age from a female standpoint.

    One thought on “Popular Fiction by Women, 1660-1730”

    1. This is a fun anthology for all of you who're desperately interested in the novel of 1660-1730, which of course is most of you. Right? The best thing about it being, it's a great refutation of the Defoe --> Richardson --> Fielding school of thought in terms of the development of the novel. There were blockbuster novelists in the early 1700s, writing what people wanted to read, which was mostly romance and high adventure (and pirate attacks!). And those novelists were largely women. Defoe a [...]

    2. This is a fascinating anthology of short works of fiction by popular female authors from the time period listed. It's really interesting to see what women were writing, to whom those writings were directed, and how that informs future works of fiction.

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